Digital Nomad Destinations

Planning the Perfect Road Trip in 10 Easy Steps

Need help organizing your trip? Here are 10 steps to plan your next road trip and get the most out of your adventure!

Beginner’s Guide to Swap Housing

House swapping has been around for a long time, but many people are still unaware that it can allow you to travel the world without spending too much cash!

With almost no overhead costs it will give you a lot more freedom on your trip.

But many people do not want to swap housing because they might be afraid of what will happen.

So, to help make your first house swap as easy as possible, we’ve compiled a few tips to keep you safe and comfortable during your stay.

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Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning at no additional cost to you, I will make a commission if you click through and make a purchase.

Swap Housing Meaning

House swapping is when two or more people sign up on a home exchange website and agree to stay in each other’s homes for a certain period of time.

Typically, you will be able to list the dates and length of your stay and the owner of the home will be able to do the same.

When you find someone you want to swap homes with, all it takes is a quick email and maybe a video call to confirm the arrangement.

Swap Housing Tips

If you are ready to start finding people to swap homes with, here are a few tips that you should keep in mind:

Find a reputable swap housing website.

There are many websites for swapping homes, but not all of them are legit.

That is why before agreeing to anything, make sure to check out the policies to see if there are any ridiculous or unfair terms for either party.

Make sure that both parties have complete trust in each other.

If you’re afraid that your prospective house swapper will not stay true to their word, then you should look for a different host or guest.

When it comes down to it, trust is the key to a successful house swap!

Be prepared with extra supplies.  

As with any guests coming into your home for an extended period of time, be prepared to have extra food, toiletries, and anything else that your swappers might need while staying with you.

Be prepared for the worst.    

You never know what might happen while your swappers are staying in your home.

It is always good to have some contingency plans in the event that something goes wrong.

Providing them with emergency phone numbers to call and having a first aid kit nearby are just a few things that you may want to have on hand during their stay.

Be flexible.  

While house swapping, your guests will be spending several days or weeks in your home.

Because of this, it is important to be understanding if they are ever running behind on their end or if something unexpected comes up that stops them from meeting the initial expectations.

However, do not make them feel like they can get away with anything and everything under the sun either!


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What guests will expect during the house swap

Once you have decided to swap homes, it is important to know what the expectations are for both of you so that everyone is on the same page.

Here are a few things that people normally expect when staying at your home:

A clean house.  

It’s important to have a clean house when you are expecting guests.

This means that all areas of your home should all be tidy and neat, which includes bathrooms, kitchens, living rooms, bedrooms, etc.

Comfortable beds, with clean sheets.  

We all like to sleep in comfort, so make sure to have clean sheets on all of your beds.

Remember, you want your guests to feel welcomed and comfortable!

Reliable Wi-Fi connection.  

People expect a strong internet connection when they travel these days, so make sure your Wi-Fi is reliable before you expect people to use it.

Also, be sure to share the wifi password with your guests, to avoid any inconvenience.

An overall friendly atmosphere.  

In order for house swapping to run smoothly, people need to be able to feel at home in your place.

Even if you are not a naturally hospitable person, try and let your swappers feel welcome when they arrive by providing them thoughtful welcome gifts.

A safe environment.  

When people are traveling, they will want to feel safe and secure in your home.

Talk to your swappers about staying safe and making themselves at home during their stay.

This way, you can make sure everyone is respected and feels good in the space they are staying in.

Reliable transportation.  

Even though it will not be part of your responsibility to make sure that your guests can get around town, knowing routes and having a general idea of how long it might take to get to different places can be very helpful.

So make sure to share tips on the best transportation to nearby places and main attractions.

How do I leave my home while I am away?

Leaving your home while you are away can be a little scary, especially because you will need to trust that your potential swappers are going to respect your home and leave it the way they found it.

Here are some ideas on how you can ensure that everything will be alright while you’re away:

Have them sign a contract.

When you’ve found your ideal house swapper, make sure that they agree to the terms that you have set for them to follow while they are in your home.

Ideally, the website that you use to house swap should have a contract so that the swappers have to agree to a set of rules.

By doing this, you will know exactly what they are responsible for while they are in your home and vice versa.

Leave a spare key in a very hidden spot.

If your swapper does somehow find themselves locked out of your house then leaving a spare key somewhere in the home will at least give them access to it so that they can let themselves in.

If you do not think having any extra keys lying around is safe, another option could be leaving an extra key with a trusted neighbor or friend that lives near your house.

What to look for when choosing a house swapper

There are many different things that you want to take into consideration when selecting the ideal house swapper.

Here are some ideas on what to keep in mind:

Are they responsible?

One of the most important things to think about when you are looking for a house swapper is their level of responsibility.

Before accepting a house swap, make sure that the person you’re dealing with is going to be able to respect your home, clean up after themselves, and leave it in the same condition they found it.

Ask them questions about their experience house swapping or living in a different country.

That way you have a better understanding of their experience and how they handle situations.

Do they have children?

If your potential swappers are traveling with their kids, then your situation will be a bit more different than if you were house swapping without any children involved.

It is important to remember that if there are children in the home you will need to determine whether your home is child friendly.

Make sure that any sharp corners or items you don’t want to be knocked over are out of reach and cannot be played with.

Will they respect my privacy?

Though it may be exciting to live in someone else’s home for a little while, make sure that your potential house swapper also respects your privacy and space while they are there.

If you are open to swapping with them, then they should be okay with having the place to themselves for a little while.

It is important that everyone involved knows what is expected of them so that their stay is pleasant and they don’t feel uncomfortable or unwelcome at your house.

10 Best Sites to Start House Swapping

Now that you know how to find a trustworthy house swapper and what you need to do once they arrive at your place, here is a list of the best websites that you can use if you want to start swapping homes:

HomeExchange

HomeExchange is the original website created for people who are interested in swapping homes with other travelers around the world.

To get started, members have to set up a profile, and then they can start exchanging their homes almost immediately.

Their annual membership fee is $150 which includes unlimited home exchanges for 12 months, property protection, member support and so much more.

HomeLink International

A membership-based site where you will have access to thousands of listings in different locations around the world.

HomeLink is a great resource for those who are looking for an extended stay in another country, like a long-term home exchange.

They also have American homes available if you want to find someone you can swap with close to the United States.

If you don’t mind paying an annual fee of $105, then it is definitely worth checking out their website and profiles today.

HouseTrip

Is a website that was created specifically for homeowners who want to lease out their property to travelers looking to swap housing or short-term rental.

HouseTrip includes homes all over the world, even in locations that are usually very hard to find on other sites.

If you are looking for homes in Europe, then this site is definitely worth checking out.

Be sure to look at their website if you are interested in swapping your home or temporarily renting it out to someone else who will be traveling near the area where you live.

You can sign up for free and pay just 3% per booking.

Love Home Swap

Love Home Swap allows you to swap housing with someone else in their network for as long as you like.

You will have access to thousands of listings across 100 different countries if you decide to join their website today.

Their standard membership fee is $13 monthly billed annually.

swap housing

Home for Swap

Home for Swap is a great place to begin your house swapping adventures.

You will have access to over 10,000 members from 120 different countries if you choose to use their site as a resource every day.

The best part about this website is that they offer a 24-hour support service if you need it during a swap or booking.

Their annual fee is 70 €, which allows you to list your property and connect with other users who you can swap housing with.

Holiday Swap

Holiday Swap allows you to swap housing with other people in over 100 countries so that you can stay in a new and exciting destination without having to spend too much money.

This website allows you to try the site for free for 30 days and gives you the option to sign up for the premium membership for only $10 a month.

The premium membership includes email support, property boost, a 14-day property damage guarantee, and much more.

Switch Homes

Switch Homes allows you to find homes all over the world so you can travel easily without having to spend too much money.

Currently, their site has rental listings in locations like Australia, France, United Kingdom, and more.

Their site is easy to use because they have individual property profiles for each listed homes.

All you have to do is sign up for their free membership (with no yearly fees) and then search through the available homes.

With all of these home exchange websites online, you will have access to thousands of homes all over the world.

No matter what country you want to travel to or how long you plan to stay there, it is easy to use if you don’t mind paying a small monthly fee for their services.

Remember that memberships on these websites are affordable for the most part, but always read their policies before accepting any offers or making any bookings with them.

House exchange Pros and Cons

Staying in a new home while you are traveling is oftentimes more exciting than finding a hotel room.

However, we will now take a look at some of the pros and cons with home exchanges so that you can make the best decision for yourself.

PROS:

•  Picking up new skills along the way, like cooking dishes that are native to the region you are visiting.

•  If you are interested in interior design, then swapping homes will allow you to see how other people decorate their homes.

•  Some homeowners who sign up for this type of housing exchange will give you free access to their amenities such as pools and hot tubs.

•  Saving money on accommodation all over the world is easier than ever when you use one of these websites to swap homes with someone.

•  You can connect with other like-minded people who are also looking for places to stay while they are traveling.

CONS:

•  Not all property owners will be good at communicating, which could lead to some awkward situations if you end up swapping homes with a person who doesn’t respond in a timely manner.

•  You might not feel comfortable staying in someone else’s home when you aren’t familiar with the area they live in.

•  Property owners may make demands that you are not okay with when it comes to their house rules while you are living there for a certain period of time.

•  Some homeowners might have additional plans for you during your stay, which you will need to discuss before making any agreements with them.

At the end of the day, it is up to each individual to decide if house swapping is right for them or not.

Remember that communication is key when using these types of housing exchange websites, so always make sure you confirm all of your plans with your potential host before making any agreements with them.

swap housing

How to swap houses safely

One of the biggest concerns people have when they swap housing is how safe it will be for them to live in someone else’s home.

We’ll take a look at some ways you can stay as safe while you are swapping homes with someone you don’t know.

Read each homeowner’s reviews and ratings before making any agreements with them.

If there are other people who are currently using this person’s services, then they should have testimonials or reviews that you can read through before finalizing an agreement.

Watch each homeowner’s interactions with other people

If they are rude to their customers in public, then they will probably be just as rude when they are hosting you in their home.

Make sure you have a backup plan in case anything happens with your host

If they are not willing to work with you, then you can always find another homeowner who is interested in house swapping.

Don’t be afraid to step up and speak up for yourself

If you feel as though the homeowner is treating you unfairly, then let them know that you will not stand for it.

Get references from your potential host before agreeing to anything

This is a great way to check up on them and see what other people have experienced when they have used this person’s hosting services in the past.

Do not be afraid to report dangerous situations

If you feel that you are in danger at any time when you are staying with someone, then contact the authorities.

House swapping can be a great way to travel the world, but it is important that you stay safe throughout the entire process.

As long as you use common sense when you swap housing, then it shouldn’t be too difficult to find an exchange that fits your lifestyle and budget.


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Home Swapping: Frequently Asked Questions

If you are still hesitant about participating in house swapping, then it may be helpful for you to read the most frequently asked questions below.

1. How does it work?

•  Find a reputable website to swap housing and sign up to become a member

•  Then find a homeowner who is living in your desired destination.

•  Find out how often they would like their home swapped and if you are okay with the length of time between swaps.

•  Agree on terms for swapping homes, which can include money, cheques, home swapping, or any other type of payment.

•  Once you have swapped homes with them, enjoy your trip!

2.  Are house swapping websites free?

Some housing exchange websites do allow you to swap homes for free or give you the option to pay in order to access more features on their site.

Make sure to read the terms of service for each website that you sign up with to find out if any of them include free swaps, or want you to pay money for their services.

3.  What is the best website for swapping homes?

The best website to use will depend on a few factors, including your personal preferences and what kind of exchange you are looking for.

Make sure to read each website’s reviews, terms of service, and frequently asked questions before making any agreements with them.

4.  What are the types of housing exchanges?

There are three different types of housing exchanges – direct swaps, homestays, and house sitting.

Each one is slightly different than the others, so make sure that you know how each one works before committing to any agreements with homeowners.

5.  Do I need to have a certain type of home in order to swap housing?

No, you do not need a certain type of home in order to swap with someone. Many homeowners prefer to have a larger house, but others will exchange homes with smaller properties as well.

Now that you have made it through our beginner’s guide for house swapping, we hope that you feel confident in your ability to complete this process.

If you follow the advice listed above, then it should be smooth sailing through your first experience with house swapping.

So what are you waiting for?

Start searching through the list of housing exchange websites right now so you can make your dreams of traveling the world come true.


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20 Ways to Save Money and Staying Free While Living Abroad

If you have been thinking about living abroad but hesitating to finally take the plunge because of the expense.

Don’t worry, we’ve been there too!

Luckily, we’ve come to realize that there are a lot of ways to staying free and moving does not have to break the bank.

You could find cheap accommodation by using couch-surfing, staying with friends and family members who live locally, and using public transportation instead of taxis or Uber.

There are many ways that you can cut down the cost of living abroad without sacrificing too much comfort or convenience.

To help you get started, we’ve put together 20 tips that we hope will help make your time overseas more affordable!

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Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning at no additional cost to you, I will make a commission if you click through and make a purchase.

20 Ways to Save Money and Staying Free While Living Abroad

If you’re ready to make your move and start living abroad, it’s easy to get overwhelmed by the costs involved.

When you consider flights, visas, insurance, transport costs, and accommodation it can get pretty expensive.

And many people also forget about the cost of food while living in another country.

Luckily, if you want to save money then there are several options available to help make your transition overseas more manageable.

Here are some great ways that will save you both time and money:

Work exchanges to find free accommodation.

You may be able to stay for free for a week or even longer if you’re willing to volunteer in return for your room and board.

There are plenty of opportunities available throughout the world, including homestays, B&Bs, eco-hostels, and cabins.

You could also find work as a volunteer on organic farms, or working in an animal refuge.

A few sites you can use to find free accommodation as a traveler are WWOOF, HelpX, and WorkAway.

This is a great way to enjoy a unique travel experience and save money at the same time.

Stay with local hosts through sites like Couchsurfing and Global Freeloaders.

These organizations allow you to stay with hosts who want to meet and help travelers from all over the world.

Couchsurfing is a great way to meet new friends and stay with locals without paying a single cent.

Find fun activities going on in the area, have dinner together, and enjoy a free place to stay for as long as you’re traveling.

Just be aware that some Couchsurfing hosts will require you to organize your own transportation to and from their home, cook for yourself or clean up after yourself.

This is a great way to investigate the country’s culture, meet new people and save money!


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Staying with friends and family members.

If you’re already friends with someone living in the country where you’re planning to travel, this might be an obvious choice for staying free while abroad.

There’s no easier way to cut the costs of travel than to stay with friends and family members who will welcome you in their homes and give you a free place to sleep.

You may be able to get Wi-Fi, laundry facilities, some home cooking, or use of a vehicle while staying with friends or family.

This is a good option if you’re already friends with people in the country where you want to move.

But it might be hard to find an opportunity if you just arrived there and don’t know anyone.

Use public transportation to save money.

Public transportation is generally cheaper than taking taxis, Uber, or other private cars while you’re abroad.

Local buses, trains, and subways are the best choice for staying on a budget while traveling, so be sure to check what’s available in your area before opting for another form of transportation.

This is also a great way to meet locals and get familiar with the city, as well as make travel plans for other areas you might visit during your stay.

Volunteering can be an excellent way to reduce your expenses when staying abroad.

There are plenty of opportunities you could take advantage of, including working at orphanages, or with children who need extra help at school.

You could even volunteer in cafes and restaurants to get free food while you’re living abroad.

There is a lot of demand for volunteers in the community, so have a look on sites like GoVolunteer and Idealist to find projects you might be interested in.

staying free

Find deals on activities

If you want to reduce the cost of your time abroad, but don’t have much free time, there are still opportunities to staying free while traveling.

Look for deals and discounts on activities, opt for free or less expensive museums, visit the library instead of a movie theater, and participate in events going on at local cafes.

You could even consider passing up paid attractions like zoos and amusement parks in favor of wandering around national parks and gardens to find fun things to do for free!

House sitting has become a popular way for people to save money while living abroad.

You could find homeowners looking to take a vacation who are willing to let you tend the house in return for free accommodation.

This is an excellent option if you’re planning on staying in one place for several weeks or months, as it will give you time to relax and explore the area without having to worry about accommodation costs.

There are several websites where you can find house sitting opportunities, including Mind My House and TrustedHousesitters.

Check out this comprehensive guide to help you find legit house-sitting jobs and staying free while abroad.

Use your credit card rewards points to save money while traveling.

If you’re staying abroad and paying for all your travel expenses with a credit card, that means you’ll also be accruing points and getting discounts on your credit card bill.

This can be helpful if you know you’ll be spending a lot of money on transport, groceries, and entertainment while abroad.

Be sure to check your credit card’s terms of service before taking advantage of this offer to find out what kind of purchases the points can be used for and how long they take to accumulate.

Homestays are a great way to staying free while abroad.

By spending the night in someone else’s home and sharing their daily routines, you can cut costs while getting a sense of how locals live and what it might be like if you decided to stay longer in that area.

There are many locals who would be willing to have a short-term “live-in guest” in return for free or reduced rent.

This is a great way to save money while traveling abroad and get a more personal perspective on the city where you’re living.

Homestays are also an excellent way for you to get comfortable with your surroundings before deciding whether you want to stay longer.

Teach English Abroad to save money.

There are plenty of opportunities to teach English overseas by doing TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language).

You could even do this from the comfort of your current home, as it may be possible to teach students online.

This is an excellent way for you to have some spare cash on hand while you’re traveling, and can often be a great opportunity for you to network and establish contacts that could be useful for jobs in the future.

It might also lead to a possible teaching position if you decide to stay longer, as many schools prefer international teachers who have experience teaching English as a second language.

Here is an article that will help you find online teaching jobs to earn extra income.

Becoming an Au Pair is an excellent way for you to staying free and saving.

Au pairs spend time with local children in exchange for room and board, saving the family cost of purchasing childcare.

You can also spend your spare time exploring the area when your host family is not using your services.

This is a great way to explore, as you’ll be living with a local family and can ask them for recommendations of things to do in their area.

Swapping Houses is a great way to staying free while living abroad.

You could do a house swap with someone in a different area or country, staying in their home while having them stay in yours.

This is good if you’re only going to be staying for a week-long holiday and don’t want to commit long term, but it can also be a good way to stay longer and experience what it’s like living in a new country.

You can find sites for people looking to swap houses such as Home Exchange and Love Home Swap.

Make sure to check out our comprehensive guide to house swapping to help you stay abroad for free.

Stay at hostels and guesthouses for cheap accommodation.

These places are great options if you want to meet other travelers and share travel stories or local knowledge with them.

You can often find dormitory rooms, private rooms with multiple beds, and shared apartments depending on how much money you plan to spend each night.

You may also find discounts for staying at hostels and guest houses if you’re traveling during the off-season or on a weekday.

staying free

Get yourself a Student Travel Card to stay free while traveling.

This is an excellent way for students to save money while they travel and explore the country or city they are living in.

These cards can help you get discounts on your transport and admission into local attractions, such as museums or other points of interest.

Keep in mind that these cards may only be available to full-time students and may require you to prove your status.

Check out this article to find the best online jobs for students to earn extra income from anywhere.

Shop at local supermarkets to meet your needs.

If you want to save money with your food, make sure that you go to the local supermarket and purchase ingredients that you can cook at home.

This is an excellent way to save money on your food, while also meeting any dietary needs you may have.

You can also get fresh produce from local street markets or stores for a lower price than the cost of eating out every day.

Find local events to get free or cheap tickets.

Many cities have free weekend events, such as festivals or street performances that are worth attending.

You can also look online to find other people who are organizing their own ‘house party’ events to get cheap access to exclusive shows, comedy nights, and other fun activities.

This is a good way to discover new things while staying free in a new location.

Get a bike for cheap to save on transport.

If you’re living in a city and don’t plan to travel too far to explore, then get yourself a bike.

This will help you get around for cheap while staying in shape in the process.

You can find affordable bikes on sites like Craigslist or Facebook Marketplace depending on where you’re living.

This will not only help you save on gas, but it will also give you a chance to explore the area without having to pay for parking.

Get a low-cost cell phone plan to stay connected.

When you’re abroad, it’s important to keep in touch with your friends and family back home so that they know you’re okay.

This can be especially hard if you don’t have a credit history in your new country.

However, if you’re staying abroad for a short period of time, then it’s easy to get an affordable pay-as-you-go phone plan that will allow you to call friends and family back home.

You may even be able to find better deals on your cell phone bill by looking online.

Get your travel gear at a thrift store to save money.

There are hundreds of items that you can purchase second-hand for low prices.

Look up these stores online before starting your trip, so that you know where to go to get the most value from your money.

You’ll likely find clothing, sunglasses, bags, and other accessories at a cheaper price than you would at a brand-name store.

These places are also great for getting travel gear, including tents and sleeping bags.

Thrift stores are also a great place to find unique souvenirs that you won’t find anywhere else.

Find a local guide to save on tours.

If you’re looking for an inexpensive way to explore the city, then get in touch with a local guide who can take you around and show you all of the finest attractions that your new home has to offer.

This is perfect if you don’t know where to start when it comes to exploring certain countries or cities.

You can get in touch with these guides through online listings or by asking around at your accommodation.

They will likely be more than happy to take you around for free, as long as you pay it forward and offer to do the same for other travelers when they come through town.

staying free

Saving and Staying Free Abroad: Key Takeaways

It may seem difficult to save money when you’re living abroad.

However, there are many ways to make your stay affordable and free if you look online for events or use the tips above.

Staying free can help make your trip last longer and allow you to spend more time exploring the area without having to worry about spending all of your money.

Also, remember that there are always options for earning extra income while you’re abroad to help you save more money.

Here are several articles that you may find helpful to help you find a job while on the road:

40 Easy Ways to Start Getting Paid to Work From Home

25 Trusted Online Money Making Sites to Start Working From Home

Ultimate Guide to Finding Craigslist Gigs and Start Working From Home

With so many options available, it’s easy to see why living abroad can be such an appealing option for many people.

It might seem like there’s a lot to do and learn about the area you’re visiting, but it’s easy if you know what you’re doing ahead of time!

If you follow these tips and suggestions, you’ll have no problem staying afloat while enjoying your stay in a new country.

So what are you waiting for? It’s time to save and live free!


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15 Ways To Find the Cheapest Food While Living Abroad

Food is one of the biggest expenses when you’re traveling. Here are 15 ways to save money and find the cheapest food.

Van Life 101: Guide to Living Inside a Van

Living life on the road is a dream for many people.

But it can be hard to know where to start, or what to do when you are out there in the wild.

You want more freedom and adventure in your life, but don’t know how to make that happen.

We’re going to break down everything from how much money you’ll need for your first trip (spoiler alert – not much!) all the way through choosing a vehicle and how to build it.

This guide will be as comprehensive as possible so that by the time we’re done with this article there won’t be anything left for you to worry about!

If you’re ready for an exciting new lifestyle then this guide is for you!

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Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning at no additional cost to you, I will make a commission if you click through and make a purchase.

What is Van Life?

Van life is exactly what it sounds like.

People who live in their vehicle full time with no fixed home or location.

Can you imagine…

The freedom of traveling anywhere in the world at a moment’s notice, and being able to stop for a night or two in places that are beautiful, or relaxing, or have awesome things going on?

Not having to worry about where your next meal is coming from because you can always just cook it in your van.

Being able to work wherever you want, or not at all if you don’t feel like it.

Having a completely different lifestyle from most people around you.

Not having to answer to anyone about what you do with your life, and being able to make every day exactly how you want it to be.

Sounds amazing right?

But it’s not as easy as it seems.

People romanticize the lifestyle all the time and don’t realize how much work goes into making it happen.

But if you’re up for a challenge, and curious enough to try something different then we have some great news for you…

It can be done pretty easily!


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Remote Resume Guide

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Reasons for Living Inside a Van

There are all sorts of reasons to make the jump into van life.

It could be that your current situation is draining you, and you just need to get out for a bit.

Maybe you want to do some traveling for a while before settling down somewhere else later on (that’s what many people do).

Or possibly there are just so many beautiful places in the world, and you finally want to see them for yourself.

Van life is a way of putting adventure back into your everyday life.

You are constantly looking for new things to do, and feel stimulated by all the different cultures that surround you.

It’s also a great way to save money on rent while you’re traveling.

If you’re curious about this lifestyle but aren’t sure how to get started, or what it entails then don’t worry! We’ve got you!

So, let’s start with the basics…

How to Get Started with Van Life

Well, it all starts with a van, doesn’t it?

You can’t just jump into this lifestyle without a vehicle.

Maybe you already have one that you’re planning on converting, or maybe you need to get your hands on one before you can even start thinking about this adventure.

We’re going to go over a few different options in the next section, so don’t worry if you don’t know which one will work for you just yet.

And before we get carried away talking about all the things that your van needs, let’s make sure you have some money to do this with.

It’s not going to be the cheapest thing you ever do, but it doesn’t have to break the bank either.

How Much Money Do You Need to Afford a Van to Live In?

This is the million-dollar question that nearly everyone who hasn’t done this before is wondering.

And there’s no exact answer to it either because it all depends on what kind of van you’re looking for, where it’s located in the world, and how long you plan to live in it.

It really depends on what you are looking for when buying your van.

For instance, if you want something that’s nice and luxurious then you can find a van that’s $30,000 to $60,000 or more which will get from point A to B just fine but will cost you more in the long run.

On the other hand, if you are willing to build your own custom van then it will be a lot cheaper which is around $10,000-$25,000 but it will take time to find the right parts and to do the manual labor.

And don’t forget, there are also other costs which include gas, insurance, camping site fees, dining out, recreational fees, and anything else that comes up along the way.

These can cost you between $500-$2,000 or more a month, depending on your spending habits.

There are a lot of things to keep in mind when making this decision, but usually, it’s just a matter of weighing out how much money you have to spend versus how long you plan on living in it.

Choosing Your Vehicle

The first step before you can get started with van life is obviously to choose a vehicle.

They come in all shapes and sizes so it’s best to decide what your own needs are before you even start looking at vans for sale.

For example, do you need a place to sleep and store your things?

Do you want something small and maneuverable for off-road adventures?

Or are you okay with taking up more space in exchange for having multiple beds or somewhere to put your kitchen area?

How long are you planning on traveling for before heading back home again?

There are a lot of things to think about, so let’s go ahead and break those ideas down one by one.

Does size matter?

When you first start looking into van life the allure of huge RVs is pretty powerful.

They seem like a great way to have a lot of space to yourself, and can often be converted into mobile homes at a later stage.

But then you realize how expensive they are, how much gas they need, and don’t forget about the whole ordeal of parking them overnight.

They also aren’t the best vehicles to take off-roading in most cases, something that is pretty important if you’re looking for adventure.

…But It’s All Relative!

You don’t need to spend your entire life savings on a giant RV with four beds, air conditioning, and a full kitchen.

In fact, you may find that this kind of setup isn’t perfect for your lifestyle.

That doesn’t mean you have to go out and buy the smallest vehicle in the world either (not everyone wants to drive a tiny Toyota Echo it turns out).

Take some time to think about what kinds of features you really need from your vehicle to make van life work for you.

Take a look at the different options available, and decide which ones are the best for you, now and in the future as well.

If you don’t need something with a shower or air conditioning on-board then there’s no reason to spend that kind of money.

Do You Really Need… That?

In our opinion, the most important thing to consider is your power supply.

For some reason, a lot of people forget about this when they’re thinking about the van they want to buy, and it can cause some serious problems down the road.

Not only should you look for something that has solar panels or an actual 110v power outlet, but you also want to stay away from the big diesel engine RVs.

On average they use a lot more gas and are way noisier than their smaller counterparts.

Plus, if all else fails you can always install solar panels on your roof or find an alternative place to store them inside for when you need them.

No Power? No Problem!

There are a lot of other options for people who don’t have the means to put solar panels on their vehicles.

Some people go with gas generators if they really need electricity, and others stick to smaller things like lights that run off USB power banks, phones chargers, or the cigarette lighter on your car.

Part of the charm of van life is being able to unplug from society and not having a need for all the things you’re used to.

While it may be frustrating at first, eventually you’ll find that living without those things makes you so much happier and more satisfied in the end. 

Travel Trailers vs. Vans: Which One is Right for You?

With so many types of vehicles to choose from, sometimes it’s hard to figure out which one would be the best for you.

While both are great for the nomadic lifestyle, they do have their own set of benefits that make each one perfect for different people.

To help you figure out which choice is best for you, we’ve put together a list of pros and cons to consider when making this decision.

Travel Trailer Pros:

It has more storage space than most vans and can usually fit all of your belongings with room left over for plenty of extra things.

If it’s an Airstream or other fiberglass trailer, it will be stronger and lighter, which makes it more fuel-efficient to tow.

Travel Trailer Cons:

You have to hook your trailer up to your car in order for it to work.

If something happens with the connection at the hitch or the wiring, you may be stuck until you can find a mechanic to help with it.

They can also be difficult to maneuver, especially in small spaces like parking lots and your driveway.

When choosing what type of vehicle is best for your nomadic lifestyle, always think about the things that matter to you most.

Some choose travel trailers because they need more storage space, while others prefer the freedom of not having to worry about hooking up a trailer every time they want to leave.

It’s important that you consider all aspects and go with what will work best for your unique situation.

However, if you’d rather live in a van, that’s perfectly okay too.

Van Pros:

You won’t have to worry about hooking and unhooking your van from a trailer every time you want to leave.

It only takes a few minutes to get set up in a parking lot when you’re ready to settle down for the night.

Some vans feature beds that lower down from the ceiling, so you won’t have to use an air mattress that can deflate throughout the night.

Van Cons:

You’ll be limited by how much storage space it offers and may not have a lot of room for many belongings.

If it’s hot outside and you don’t have any windows in the back to open, then you may get a little claustrophobic.

Basically, it all comes down to personal preference.

Now that we’ve given you plenty to think about and help guide your decision-making process, it’s time to make your choice.

Use this as a helpful resource, and choose the type of vehicle that is best for you!

Building Your Travel Van

If you are on a budget or maybe you are handy, you can build your own van.

This will allow you to get exactly what you want out of your van, instead of buying a pre-made setup.

It can be hard to build a van by yourself, but not impossible if you have the right guidance and tools.

Here are some tips and tricks on building your travel van:

Plan Your Layout

Before you start buying or building anything, it’s important to think about how you want your van to be laid out.

You can go with a simple bed in the back and living area upfront, or if you’re someone who needs more space, consider adding a kitchenette.

Remember that this is YOUR van, so make it functional for your own unique lifestyle.

Here is a great video by Sarah & James – Custom Crafted Vans Explaining the best van layouts.

Get Creative

To make your van feel more like home, get creative when decorating!

Do you have a knack for art?

Decorate the walls with some bright colors and cool drawings to liven up the space.

Don’t have any artistic skills?

Just add some bright lights so it’s easier to see and a few potted plants for liveliness.

Incorporate your favorite things into the design of your van so it really feels like you.

Add Storage

Having storage is very important when designing your layout since you will have limited space.

Take advantage of all the pockets and storage spaces in the overhead compartments, under the seats, and behind the driver’s seat.

Many people choose to build in extra storage bins for more efficient use of space.

If you’re someone who likes to have a lot of things with them when they travel, keep that in mind!

Building your van can be fun as long as you immediately think about how you’ll utilize the space!

If you want to get more ideas, check out this awesome video via Van Life Sagas where they give you storage hacks.

How to Stay Safe While Living Inside a Van

One of the biggest concerns people have before they find a van to live in is safety.

It’s natural to worry about someone trying to break into your vehicle, especially if it has all of your belongings inside.

Here are our tips for staying safe while living inside a van on the road:

  • Keep a flashlight, bear spray, and spare keys hidden somewhere inside your vehicle.
  • Use a heavy-duty lock that can’t be broken by attempting to pry it open with another object.  Remember that most locks on the market are made for strength, not security so you want the strongest one possible!
  • Consider parking in well-lit areas as much as possible.
  • If you have a sliding window make sure it’s either locked or closed most of the way.
  • Use curtains on all of your windows at night, even if they’re tinted: this will help deter thieves and keep people from looking inside your van when it’s dark outside.

These safety tips will help you feel much more comfortable while living inside a van.

Be sure to pay special attention to the windows on your van since most thieves will try to gain access that way if they see anything of value inside or outside of it.

Ways to Earn Money While Living inside Your Van

Another concern that van life skeptics have is whether or not they can make enough money while having a van to live in full time.

If you think about it, most of these fears are based on misconceptions about what it means to live in a van.

For one thing, people think that vans are only for people who already have lots of money and that you have to be rich to do it.

In reality, vans are for anyone who doesn’t want a normal 9-to-5 job but still wants to make enough money on the road to pay living costs in a van, buy food, and fees for adventures.

You can find lots of different jobs that will let you work remotely or even take your position full-time.

Some of these include:

Running a blog and running ads on the site.  

Earning money from display ads, referral programs, affiliate links, or Google Adsense can be an excellent way to earn an income while van life.

Check out this article that shows you have to get started with your own blog.

Freelance writing.  

If you have solid writing skills then there are tons of job opportunities for you online.

You can do blog posts, write eBooks and white papers, or even ghostwrite entire books for other people.     

Remote staffing.  

This is a newer career path that’s been gaining popularity as more companies are looking for people who can work from home and contractors who don’t mind traveling from place to place.  

You’ll need a degree in something like computer science or programming if you want to make money through a remote staffing agency, but it’s a great way to work in different places across the globe and make enough money to live comfortably.

If you want to learn more about these kinds of jobs check out FlexJobs and Fiverr.com.

Sell Art Online

If you’re a talented artist then there’s also the option to draw on your tablet or phone and sell art online through sites like DeviantArt or Etsy.

You can check out our comprehensive article here to help you get started.

Working for a company over the internet.  

If you’re skilled at social media marketing, blogging, graphic design, or even SEO then there are plenty of work-from-home opportunities since most companies don’t mind finding people who can do their job from anywhere in the world!

When you consider all of these unique opportunities, it becomes clear that van life isn’t just for people who already have money.

As long as you’re capable of doing a good job, companies and entrepreneurs will give you plenty of options to work from wherever there is an internet connection.

As you can see, living inside a van isn’t nearly as expensive or risky as most people think.

Whether you’re looking for a new way to travel in style or want to save money on rent while still being able to afford the things you need, having a van to live in is a great option that’s perfect for anyone giving up their 9-to-5 job.

living inside a van

What Are the Challenges of Vanlife?

If you are thinking of living inside a van, it’s essential that you understand what you are letting yourself in for.

Living on the road isn’t all sunshine and rainbows; there are certainly some major challenges to overcome.

Here are a few challenges you may face while having a van to live in:

Building trust with other people and yourself can be hard.  

The best way to get over this is simply by starting your journey, even if that means going on day trips for now.  

Once you’ve made it out of the city it’s much easier to make friends at campgrounds, etc.

It can be intimidating at first especially if you are doing this solo, but don’t let that stop you.

You’ll be surprised how much fun it is to meet new people and make friends from all over the world!

You’ll most likely have limited storage space at some point.  

This is especially true if you live with another person or bring a lot of expensive camera gear with you!  

You’ll have to find other ways of storing things, so make sure to get creative with it.

It can become lonely being away from friends and family for long periods of time.  

This is definitely one of the biggest challenges with van life.  

The best way to overcome loneliness is by joining online VanLife communities on Facebook, Reddit, and YouTube.

On top of that, there are a lot of great meetups and events for people who live on the road as well!

Weather can be a big obstacle 

This might not apply to everyone, but winter can be incredibly challenging while living inside a van in colder climates.  

Make sure you do your research and check what the weather is like during different times of the year before making any big decisions on where you want to live.  

It may even be worth spending part of the year somewhere warm, and the other part in a place with more diverse weather.

If you’re really lucky, both will work out fine!

There will be a lot of obstacles on the road

Whether it’s staying in a parking lot for weeks on end, finding food every day, or dealing with the people who think vans are just homes for hobos.

In fact, the biggest obstacle of them all is your mind.  

It’s hard to stay positive when you’re living in a tiny place and not being able to shower on a daily basis.  

The best way to overcome this is by continuing on your journey, even if you’re tired and feeling defeated.    

It’s important to keep moving forward and remember why you started living inside a van in the first place.

If all else fails just take a deep breath, count your blessings, and think of all of the awesome things to come!

Find Work Can be Difficult

Another obstacle you’ll face is trying to find work while being on the road.

It’s hard to maintain a consistent job when you don’t have an address or are constantly on the move.

The best way around this is to simply find work online!

Take a look at Upwork, Fiverr, or Freelancer for some work that you can do remotely from your laptop.

Alternatively, you could also find part-time work at a campground/RV resort in exchange for a free stay!

It’s not the easiest way to make money but it comes with other perks as well.

If any or all of the above may seem daunting to you then the best solution might be to have a nice chat with a friend or family member.

Even just letting them know that you’re considering it and asking questions can help ease your mind as well as theirs! 

Best Resources to Help You Transition to Vanlife

If you’re just starting out it can be difficult to find the right tools to help you transition into van life.

We have found the best resources that we recommend to make this process as seamless as possible.

There are also a ton of great blogs and vlogs about living in vans out there that you may find useful for getting new ideas.

Some of the best include:

1.     Hobo Ahle [Solo Female VanLifer]

2.    GNomad Home  [top resource for van building]

3.     TinyHomeTruck [learn how to convert a truck into a tiny home!]

4.     Novel Kulture [how to make money on the road]

5.     Diversify Van Life [highlights the less-heard voices in the Vanlife and Nomadic communities]

There are also a ton of great books out there about living inside a van. Some are focused on specific regions, whereas others are more general guides to van life!

Some of the best include:

1.     How to live in a van and travel: Live everywhere, be free, and have adventures on a campervan or motorhome – your home on wheels

2.    Van Build: A complete DIY guide to designing, converting, and self-building your campervan or motorhome

3.    Where Should We Camp Next?: A 50-State Guide to Amazing Campgrounds and Other Unique Outdoor Accommodations (Plan a Family-Friendly Budget-Conscious Summer Trip)

4.    How to Live the Dream: Things Every Van Lifer Needs to Know 

5.   100 Parks, 5,000 Ideas: Where to Go, When to Go, What to See, What to Do

These resources will be a huge help to you if you’re new to van life. 


Free Work Online Training

Still confused and don’t know how to find an online job? This training will help you learn how to land your ideal remote job ASAP! 


What’s Next?   

Now that you understand more about what van life is all about, it’s time for you to take the plunge and start living your best life.  

There’s nothing stopping you from going out tomorrow and buying a van, but if you need some more time then just go on day trips for now or even rent one for a weekend.

Having a van to live in might seem like it is too much hassle, but trust us, once you get past the first month or two, it becomes so much easier!  

Just make sure to take your time and be smart about what van will work best with your budget.  

Vanlife is all about making new friends, seeing the world from a different perspective, and challenging yourself to be the best you can be.  

Don’t let your fear of change stop you from going out there and making it happen.


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Ultimate List of the Cheapest Place to Live in EU for Digital Nomads

In recent years, there has been more remote work opportunities and because of this new sense of freedom, many have been flocking to the cheapest place to live in EU.

Most digital nomads are freelancers, full-time employees of remote companies or have online businesses they operate from anywhere. 

The growth of remote companies have also improved the income of many nomads, making this lifestyle, not just possible but also sustainable.  

When lockdowns began to relax, several European territories offered digital nomad visas to remote workers. 

Digital nomads have naturally gravitated to European cities because of high-speed internet, safety, closeness to parks, hiking trails, and the communities of expats.

As travel continues to normalize, you may be wondering where to go first as a digital nomad. 

Today, we take a closer look at both famous and little-known European cities that are affordable for digital nomads. 

Below is a list of the best European cities to live in for digital nomads and remote workers. 

RELATED POSTS:

Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links, meaning at no additional cost to you, I will make a commission if you click through and make a purchase.

1. Krakow, Poland

Poland may not be the first thing on your mind when scouting for the best European cities for digital nomads. 

However, it is on our list because Krakow is rich in history, culture, architecture, and it competes with other EU cities in terms of quality of life, and is one of the cheapest place to live in EU.

cheapest place to live in EU

You can have a relatively high quality of life with just $600/month, plus the rent. 

Meals are cheap at $6 or less, wines typically cost $7 while cappuccinos are super affordable at $2.50. 

Here is a breakdown of rent in Krakow, Poland:

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$566.39 USD
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$440.86 USD
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$1,052.9 USD
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$717.69 USD

Digital nomads will discover that Krakow is a popular center for history and entertainment. 

The city is also home to medieval architecture, and you can also head over to the salt mine, the Wawel Castle, and boasts to have the best public square in the world.

Do you love bars and the nightline? Then Krakow may be the perfect place for you, since it is known for having the second-highest bar and nightlife density in the Europe.

2. Ljubljana, Slovenia

Compared to other European capitals, Ljubljana is relatively tiny. 

Ljubljana provides equal access to both winter resorts and beaches. 

While the cost of living plus rent is slightly higher than Krakow at $800, it’s still one of the best European cities to live in.

Here is a breakdown of rent in Ljubljana, Slovenia:

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$690.87 USD
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$502.04 USD
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$1,269.66 USD
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$955.65 USD

Ljubljana is a precious capital with lush hills and a river that flows into the heart of the city. 

Digital nomads are often surprised at how quickly they get attached to this gem of a town. 

It’s charming, historic and has a bit of everything that contributes to being one of the best European cities for digital nomads.

Despite the medieval architecture, Ljubljana is modern and has an excellent nightlife. 

Head over to the Triglav National Park for some summer hiking or skiing during the winter months. 

If you want some beach action, there are always the beaches in Croatia and Italy, which are relatively close to Ljubljana. 

Making this city not only one of the cheapest place to live in EU but also close to many hot spots. 

 3. Plovdiv, Bulgaria

Plovdiv is best known for being the oldest city in the EU and is divided into two remarkable areas that are both excellent options for digital nomads traveling through Europe. 

Compared to the rest of Europe, you can comfortably live in Plovdiv as a digital nomad for just $500 (excluding rent) making it one of the cheapest place to live in EU. 

Here is a breakdown of rent in Plovdiv, Bulgaria:

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$294.84 USD
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$215.17 USD
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$484.53 USD
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$335.67 USD

Wine is also more affordable at $4 per bottle, and you’ll save on cappuccinos, at $1.20 per cup.

Plovdiv is also remarkable for its cute, rolling hills, and should you climb these hills, you will be treated with amazing city views.

Everyone loves a walkable city, and this destination will allow you to take a ton of strolls to explore.

The city center gives you access to charming shops and restaurants that will help fill your curiosity about Scandinavia.

The Kapana area is best described as bohemian, and you will find award-winning restaurants and exciting bars that will make your stay more fun and exciting. 

The other side of Plovdiv is considered the old town. If you want to see homes from the era of the Bulgarian Revival, this is where you need to visit. 

The old town is also home to elegant guest houses, art galleries, and fascinating museums.

 

4. Copenhagen, Denmark

Copenhagen is a remarkable modern city, and is highly walkable, which makes it one of the best European countries for digital nomads. 

If you love to stroll around, then Copenhagen would be the perfect place for you.

The cost of living in Copenhagen is higher than the three previous destinations we’ve mentioned. 

If you have $1,200 for food and other basic needs (excluding rent), then you can live comfortably in this location.

Here is a breakdown of rent in Copenhagen, Denmark:

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$1,200 USD
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$850 USD
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$2,200 USD
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$1,500 USD

Copenhagen is well-organized, has a lot of sights to see, and the people are friendly to expats. 

And if you love biking, then the city has even more to offer. 

There are also many green spaces for everyone, and the local government has been funding efforts to attain carbon-neutral spaces.

As for the language barrier, Copenhagen is a place where you can freely converse in English with the locals. 

There is also a growing expat community to expand your network in one of the best European countries for digital nomads. 

 5. Zagreb, Croatia

cheapest place to live in EU

Our list of cheap digital nomad Europe cities, won’t be complete without Zagreb. 

This destination features a charming, contemporary feel combined with traditional architecture. 

In recent years, more adventurous digital nomads have made Zagreb their home base. 

The cost of living is somewhere between Copenhagen and Plovdiv. 

You can certainly live comfortably at $700, plus the rent. 

Here is a breakdown of rent in Zagreb, Croatia:

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$563.63 USD
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$390.69 USD
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$920.38 USD
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$640.80 USD

Meals are slightly more expensive at $9/meal, but local wines make up for it at $6 per bottle. 

Cafes will charge you around $2 per cup making it one of the cheapest place to live in EU.

Zagreb offers rustic, cobblestone streets packed with traditional eateries, cafes, and art shops. 

The historical buildings here are all well-maintained and accessible. Be sure to visit the Zagreb Cathedral for authentic Gothic architecture. 

Want to cook from home? Try the fresh produce at the Dolac Market.

Seaside visits are also accessible when you live in Zagreb.

This digital nomad Europe city constantly innovates and is the perfect choice for remote workers who want accessibility and the unique European lifestyle. 

6. Malaga, Spain

Malaga has experienced significant growth in the past decade, making the city one of the best place to live in EU. 

Modern Malaga has drawn digital nomads from all over the world. 

If you have always wanted to live by the beach, then Malaga is the place for you. 

For just $700 a month (excluding rent) and an average of $10 per meal, you can comfortably live in this beautiful beach town.

Here is a breakdown of rent in Malaga, Spain:

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$798.74 USD
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$602.89 USD
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$1,343.21 USD
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$966.43 USD

Spanish wines will set you back a mere five dollars, but the cafes are just as affordable as anywhere else in Europe.

Geographically, Malaga is surrounded by beaches on one end and mountains on the other. 

This means more opportunities to enjoy hiking or swimming, which makes this truly one of the best places to live in EU.

Strolling through Malaga is a great way to see this beautiful city and experience the beautiful historic center. 

Buildings with traditional architecture have all been updated, and Malaga boasts fantastic nightlife all year round. 

If you like preparing your meals, you can always head over to the fresh produce markets around the city. 

With all this city has to offer, it is truly one of the best and cheapest places to live in EU. 

 7. Porto, Portugal

cheapest place to live in EU

Porto is frequently called the most picturesque city, and it has definitely lived up to the hype.

Porto is a seaside city, which means daily opportunities to be at the beach and living the ideal digital nomad lifestyle

The culture and city life are also exciting, and if you want a quaint pocket of Portugal, Porto is a great option! 

Porto is not a busy digital nomad city, but it’s a beautiful place to live in, and ideal for a quiet place to do some relaxation. 

Here is a breakdown of rent in Porto, Portugal:

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$824.78 USD
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$588.71 USD
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$1,565.82 USD
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$990.9 USD

If you want to feel like a true bohemian, there’s always the Cais de Ribeira, where you can find excellent bars and restaurants to taste the local cuisine.

After a hard day at work, why not stroll across the city and discover the quaint gardens, museums, and churches. 

But for many nomads who visit this city, they are often drawn to the beach and who can blame them! 

With all of these incredible perks, Porto is truly one of the best and cheapest European cities to live in. 

8. Vienna, Austria

The historic city of Vienna is one of the best places to live for digital nomads. It is scenic, modern, safe, and culturally diverse. 

While it is not one of the cheapest European cities to live in, the cost of living is still pretty affordable compared to the major metropolitan cities in Europe. 

Set aside $800 per month (on top of rent), and expect to pay an average of $12 per meal.

Here is a breakdown of rent in Vienna, Austria:

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$1,025.64 USD
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$772.14 USD
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$2,111.32 USD
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$1,511.53 USD

Having access to the famous Vienna State Opera is a huge perk for music lovers. 

With so many things to do, be prepared to discover incredible cultural experiences while in Vienna.

The city also has many modern co-working spaces fit for the most demanding remote jobs.

These incredible benefits truly make Vienna one of the best place to live Europe.

 9. Athens, Greece

cheapest place to live in EU

Just the name of this city conjures timeless images of Greek mythology. 

But Athens offers more than just legends which makes it in our list of the best place to live in Europe. 

It is an ideal place for digital nomads because the cost of living is reasonable (just $750/month on average, plus rent), and it is the best place for history buffs, too! 

Here is a breakdown of rent in Athens, Greece:

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$850 USD
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$632.99 USD
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$1,568.05 USD
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$1,251.39 USD

If you dream of visiting Greek ruins and living right next to exciting monuments, then Athens is a beautiful place to live as a digital nomad.

Although the city is surrounded by history, it also embraces modern conveniences which makes this a great hub for remote workers. 

There are also open-air markets to visit that will allow you to experience local life in Athens. 

 10. Belgrade, Serbia

cheapest place to live in EU

Belgrade has been called the Berlin of Eastern Europe. 

The housing market is robust all year-round, and life here is simple and easy-going. 

Belgrade is another city where you can comfortably live with just a thousand dollars a month. 

The average cost of living here is just $550, and restaurant meals are cheap at $7, making Belgrade one of the cheapest place to live in EU. 

Here is a breakdown of rent in Belgrade, Serbia:

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$279.58 USD
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$168.47 USD
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$578.17 USD
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$245.7 USD

The cultural scene is the biggest draw for many digital nomads, and could be the perfect place for you too! 

The ten cities in our list are all great options for anyone looking for the most scenic and cheapest places to live in EU. 

So whether you are looking for a stroll along the beautiful city of Belgrade or chill in Porto, Europe is a fantastic place for digital nomads.


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Best Places to Work Remotely in the United States

Experts estimate that around 31% of the workforce has shifted to remote work when the COVID-19 pandemic struck and will most likely continue to rise through the years. 

That is why finding affordable places to work remotely can make your digital nomad life more exciting since rent can be cheaper, the environment better, and will allow you to find a community that embraces your lifestyle. 

Locating places to work remotely can be a rewarding financial move.

You want to look for digital nomad destinations that are less expensive than your original location, so it will be a more sustainable environment.

We have found the best places to work remote in the United States.

The list is based on important factors like walkability, quality of life, weather, proximity to nature, and housing costs.

Related Articles: 

There is no single measurement to judge which locations are the best cities for a remote worker, but the following locations should help figure out where to move, should you be on the lookout for the best places to work remotely in the US.

Keep in mind, all information is subject to change, so check each local destination for recently updated data.

Madison, Wisconsin

Topping our list of best places to work remotely is Madison, Wisconsin which is affectionately known as the City of Four Lakes.

Despite having higher housing expenses than the average city in the US, the city more than makes up for it by providing a nice meld of city life and rural living.

Organic farm-to-restaurant meals are booming in the city, and if a more rustic life appeals to you, then this city with a population of 260,000 is the right place for you.

best places to work remotely

Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$1,228.33
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$958.91
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$2,030.53
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$1,574.39

Meals and Beverage Cost

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$14.50
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$55.00
Domestic Beer$5.00
Cappuccino$4.14

Transportation

One-way Ticket (Local Transport)$2.00
Monthly Pass (Regular Price)$65.00
Taxi Start (Normal Tariff)$4.00
Gasoline (1 gallon)$2.29
Data collected from Numbeo.com

Rogers, Arkansas

With a small population of 67,000, Rogers, Arkansas, is one of the best places to work from anywhere in the United States.

Rogers has a high quality of life, and the weather is superb most of the year.

Rogers has a strong rural feel, so you may feel more relaxed here than in the crowded city.

The affordability also makes this the ideal place for remote work in the USA.

Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$1,070.00
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$716.67
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$1,200.00
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$1,016.67

Meals and Beverage Cost

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$12.00
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$45.00
Domestic Beer $4.00
Cappuccino$4.00 
Data collected from Numbeo.com

Des Moines, Iowa

If you are looking. for the best places to work remotely and also raise a family, then Des Moines, Iowa may be the perfect place for you.

As the fastest growing city in the Mid-West, many families with kids flock to this beautiful city due to its quiet and clean neighbourhoods, thriving downtown and new high-end housing developments popping up.

There is also a ton to do with so many events and festivals happening in the downtown area.

best places to work remotely

Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$985.62
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$869.77
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$1,612.57
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$1,184.88

Meals and Beverage Cost

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$15.00
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$40.00
Domestic Beer $4.00
Cappuccino$4.11

Transportation

One-way Ticket (Local Transport)$1.75
Monthly Pass (Regular Price)$48.00
Taxi Start (Normal Tariff)$2.00
Gasoline (1 gallon)$2.28
Data collected from Numbeo.com

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Another city that tops our list of places to work remotely is Grand rapids.

The second-largest city in Michigan boasts affordable living, a growing arts scene, incredible outdoor activities, as well as excellent food and beer!

You can’t go wrong living in one of the best places for remote work.

best places to work remotely

Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$985.62
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$869.77
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$1,612.57
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$1,184.88

Meals and Beverage Cost

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$15.00
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$40.00
Domestic Beer $4.00
Cappuccino$4.11

Transportation

One-way Ticket (Local Transport)$1.75
Monthly Pass (Regular Price)$48.00
Taxi Start (Normal Tariff)$2.00
Gasoline (1 gallon)$2.28
Data collected from Numbeo.com

Eau Claire, Wisconsin

Eau Claire’s affordability and claim to fame as the fastest-growing small town in Wisconsin makes this one of the best places to work remotely in the USA.

Although a small town with a population of 68,187, it has a ton to offer.

With a low unemployment rate, low cost of living, great universities and high paying jobs it is one of the best cities for remote workers.

Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$700.00
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$668.75
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$1,200.00
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$1,083.33

Meals and Beverage Cost

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$15.00
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$45.00
Domestic Beer $2.50 
Cappuccino$3.58

Transportation

One-way Ticket (Local Transport)$1.75
Monthly Pass (Regular Price)$47.50
Taxi Start (Normal Tariff)$2.50
Gasoline (1 gallon)$2.21
Data collected from Numbeo.com

best places to work remotely

Omaha, Nebraska

Not many people think of Omaha, Nebraska, when they want to live in a bustling city.

Surprisingly, this city has a lot of tech companies where you can find remote work near you.

Omaha is known for being the home base of some Fortune 500 companies and tech start-ups.

Omaha has a great tech market, so should you be interested in remote work that has to be near the headquarters, which makes Omaha one of the best places to work remotely.

Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$930.94
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$766.67
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$1,595.83
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$1,333.33

Meals and Beverage Cost

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$14.68
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$50.00
Domestic Beer $4.50 
Cappuccino$4.43

Transportation

One-way Ticket (Local Transport)$1.38
Monthly Pass (Regular Price)$54.00
Taxi Start (Normal Tariff)$3.50
Gasoline (1 gallon)$2.29
Data collected from Numbeo.com

Lancaster, Pennsylvania

Lancaster is on our list of the best cities for remote workers due to its balance between small-town feel yet big-time conveniences.

Rolling hills with expansive farms are met with manicured suburbs that are a few hours away from the bustling city.

Lancaster boasts unique groups of people from farmers, families, students and professionals which makes this one of the best places for remote work since it holds something for everyone!

best places to work remotely

Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$911.43
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$849.88
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$1,671.43
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$1,457.14

Meals and Beverage Cost

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$20.00
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$60.00
Domestic Beer $4.00
Cappuccino$4.00

Transportation

One-way Ticket (Local Transport)$2.75
Monthly Pass (Regular Price)$60.00
Taxi Start (Normal Tariff)$6.00 
Gasoline (1 gallon)$2.62
Data collected from Numbeo.com

St. Paul, Minnesota

Living in the Twin Cities opens you to slightly balmy summers and the opportunity to enjoy incredible winter sports.

St. Paul, Minnesota is generally affordable for digital nomads and is also known for its great food and cultural diversity.

Living in St. Paul is just five percent more expensive than other similarly populated cities, and utility costs here are nine percent lower.

Expenses like bus fares are also lower compared to other states, making St. Paul a solid pick for the best places for remote work.

best places to work remotely

Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$1,422.84
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$1,182.26
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$2,461.11
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$1,677.78

Meals and Beverage Cost

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$16.00
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$75.00
Domestic Beer $5.00
Cappuccino$4.42

Transportation

One-way Ticket (Local Transport)$2.25 
Monthly Pass (Regular Price)$65.00
Taxi Start (Normal Tariff)$6.00 
Gasoline (1 gallon)$2.62
Data collected from Numbeo.com

Camden, Maine

There are less than five thousand residents at Camden, so it’s also ideal for people who don’t like bustling metropolis-type cities.

Camden is known for the best seafood restaurants and classy sailing opportunities.

The cost of living here is a little higher than in other cities, but housing costs can be as little as $900/month. The lower cost of housing can help compensate for pricier expenses throughout the year.

best places to work remotely

Rent Per Month

Studio Apartment$754
Apartment (1 bedroom)$801
Apartment (2 bedroom)$1,006
Apartment (3 bedrooms)$1309

St. Augustine, Florida

St. Augustine, Florida, offers ninety days of warm and sunny weather.

About 70% of all St. Augustine residents live near a park. The cost of living and rent at St. Augustine is below most comparable US cities.

best places to work remotely

Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$1,183.33
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$816.67
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$2,300.00
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$1,517.00

Meals and Beverage Cost

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$13.00
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$40.00
Domestic Beer $5.00
Cappuccino$4.00

Transportation

One-way Ticket (Local Transport)$1.00
Taxi Start (Normal Tariff)$6.00 
Gasoline (1 gallon)$2.62
Data collected from Numbeo.com

Traverse City, Michigan

Traverse City provides numerous parks and outdoor activities to make your days more exciting and relaxing.

There’s something to do year-round if you feel like leaving your digital workspace, and if you’re craving good food, there’s always endless waterfront restaurants at your fingertips.

The rent of a two-bedroom unit in Traverse City is lower than the cost in other similar cities.

best places to work remotely

Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$1,287.50
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$1,133.33
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$1,900.00
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$1,633.33

Meals and Beverage Cost

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$15.00
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$50.00
Domestic Beer $6.50
Cappuccino$3.75

Transportation

One-way Ticket (Local Transport)$1.50
Taxi Start (Normal Tariff)$35.00
Gasoline (1 gallon)$3.25
Data collected from Numbeo.com

Las Vegas, Nevada

Las Vegas isn’t just interesting for the strip – it’s one of the best places for remote workers who thoroughly enjoy the adventure.

It’s a beautiful base if you like hiking and trekking, and there are also plenty of national parks to enjoy nearby.

The average rent in Las Vegas is surprisingly lower than in other cities.

The city is highly diverse, and you will have access to great weather and an unending stream of activities all year-round.

best places to work remotely

Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$1,191.09
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$920.17
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$2,087.35
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$1,572.69

Meals and Beverage Cost

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$15.00
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$72.50
Domestic Beer $6.00
Cappuccino$4.68

Transportation

One-way Ticket (Local Transport)$2.00
Monthly Pass (Regular Price)$65.00
Taxi Start (Normal Tariff)$3.50
Gasoline (1 gallon)$2.71
Data collected from Numbeo.com

Memphis, Tennessee

Known for its great nightlife and incredible music scene, Memphis makes it in our list for one of the best places to work remotely.

On average, the cost of living in Memphis is 17% lower than comparable cities in the US.

Additionally, there is a great housing market, and you can expect a more comfortable stay anywhere in the city because of Memphis’ legendary Southern hospitality.

best places to work remotely

Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$1,035.52
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$846.72
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$1,601.93
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$1,237.45

Meals and Beverage Cost

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$15.00
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$47.50
Domestic Beer $5.00
Cappuccino$4.62

Transportation

One-way Ticket (Local Transport)$1.75 
Monthly Pass (Regular Price)$50.00
Taxi Start (Normal Tariff)$2.00
Gasoline (1 gallon)$2.26
Data collected from Numbeo.com

Kansas City, Missouri

Kansas City is well worth checking out if you are a remote worker who wishes to live in a city with small-town hospitality.

Kansas City is known for the efficient production of consumer products and food, so the costs of transporting these state-wide are lower.

Which makes Kansas City not only an affordable option but also has a lot of industry backing its local economy.

best places to work remotely

Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$1,177.33 
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$803.02
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$1,544.12
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$1,180.93

Meals and Beverage Cost

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$16.00
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$60.00 
Domestic Beer $4.00
Cappuccino$4.23

Transportation

One-way Ticket (Local Transport)$1.50
Monthly Pass (Regular Price)$50.00
Taxi Start (Normal Tariff)$2.50
Gasoline (1 gallon)$2.17
Data collected from Numbeo.com

Greenville, South Carolina

With its unique charm and energetic atmosphere, Greenville is the perfect destination for digital nomads looking for places to work remotely that are rich in history with a growing economy.

It’s low tax rates and becoming a major hubbub for fortune 500 companies, Greenville is a city with plenty of opportunities and amenities for young professionals.

best places to work remotely

Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$1,335.71
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$959.00
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$1,875.00
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$1,418.75

Meals and Beverage Cost

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$14.50
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$56.50 
Domestic Beer $5.50
Cappuccino$4.14

Transportation

One-way Ticket (Local Transport)$1.50
Monthly Pass (Regular Price)$54.00
Taxi Start (Normal Tariff)$3.50 
Gasoline (1 gallon)$2.11
Data collected from Numbeo.com

Huntsville, Alabama

Ranked #7 as one of the best places to live in the United States, making Huntsville a top place to work remotely as a digital nomad.

With so many tech companies calling Huntsville, Alabama home, you will find companies like Facebook, Google, Toyota, Mazda, LG, multiple rocket manufacturers and even the FBI in the area.

Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$1,068.75
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$658.75
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$1,783.33
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$1,178.57

Meals and Beverage Cost

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$12.00
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$47.50
Domestic Beer $4.00
Cappuccino$4.67

Transportation

One-way Ticket (Local Transport)$1.00
Monthly Pass (Regular Price)$38.00
Taxi Start (Normal Tariff)$3.50
Gasoline (1 gallon)$2.18
Data collected from Numbeo.com

Wilmington, Delaware

Wilmington is home to several big banks in the country, so there’s plenty of money in the local economy, which enriches the community. Delaware has excellent weather, and you will also not run out of places to visit or outdoor activities to sign up for.

best places to work remotely

Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$1,285.71
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$980.00
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$1,637.50
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$1,366.67

Meals and Beverage Cost

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$15.00
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$50.00
Domestic Beer $3.25
Cappuccino$3.50

Transportation

One-way Ticket (Local Transport)$2.00
Monthly Pass (Regular Price)$40.00
Taxi Start (Normal Tariff)$6.45 
Gasoline (1 gallon)$2.37
Data collected from Numbeo.com

With so many new remote work opportunities, moving to affordable and even exotic locations are now becoming a reality.

Those who eventually decide to make the big move will realize that some unusual locations can be a great place to stay if you are a remote worker.

So, go ahead and start your new remote lifestyle in your ideal destination, you never know what you’ll find.


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Ultimate Guide to Countries Who Offer Digital Nomad Visa to Work Remotely

With more remote work becoming steadily available, some countries are opening applications for digital nomad visas to professionals who want to stay a year or more in a new country.

The digital nomad visa, also called the freelancer’s visa, is granted to working nomads who own location-independent businesses or have secured a full-time remote work position.

Working nomads must operate their businesses from remote locations and there are also income requirements that vary, depending on the countries offering the digital nomad visas.

If you meet certain digital nomad countries’ requirements, there is a higher possibility of being approved for a remote worker visa or digital nomad visa.

Below is our list of the best destinations that offer digital nomad visas for those looking to relocate and experience the world.

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1. Thailand

Expats have always loved Thailand. The cost of living in the country is very affordable.

Professionals who decide to live in digital nomad hubs like Chaing Mai can comfortably live on $755 USD a month, with average cost of rent at $468 USD.

digital nomad visa

Chiang Mai Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$360.08
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$273.03
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$780.66
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$486.45

Cost of Meal and Beverage

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$1.71
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$19.47
Domestic Beer$2.24
Cappuccino$1.91
Data collected from Costof.live

Right now, Thailand is gearing up to offer its version of the digital nomad Thailand visa or remote worker visa.

There isn’t a formal digital nomad Thailand visa yet, as they are already welcome to stay as long as they fulfill the working requirements while working on their businesses in Thailand.

Thailand also has a ton of co-working spaces where they can manage their businesses that are registered outside of Thailand using their digital nomad visas.

So what type of digital nomads are they welcoming to Thailand?

They would like to welcome professionals who do not and will not compete with Thai workers and professionals while living in the coutry.

They also should not need or apply for a working permit while living in Thailand, and can fully support themselves from their online business, or be able to have full-time remote work that’s outside of the county.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Thailand issues various visas, including non-immigrant visas.

Which includes the Thai SMART Visa that’s designed to attract skilled business owners who wish to invest in Thailand.

Once you receive the visa, you will be granted maximum of 4 year stay and are given other privileges.

2. Estonia

There’s a good reason why there’s demand for digital nomad visa Estonia, since this is a region that offers both a lower cost of living and breathtaking sceneries.

Nomads who decide to live in a popular city like Tallinn can comfortably live on $1,366 USD a month, with average cost of rent at $827 USD.

Tallinn, Estonia Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$637.55
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$441.53
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$1,119.09
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$782.72

Cost of Meal and Beverage

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$9.75
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$57.91
Domestic Beer $4.73
Cappuccino$3.26
Data collected from Costof.live

The country’s government has already launched the Estonia digital nomad visa late last year.

The Estonia digital nomad visa will allow working nomads to legally work in the country if they have businesses registered abroad or work for clients that live outside of Estonia.

As of August 1, 2020, location-independent workers have been applying to work for up to a year in the country without breaking the law (i.e., using a tourist visa instead of a proper digital nomad visa).

There may be continued COVID-19-related restrictions for applying for a digital nomad visa in Estonia, so it’s best to sign up for Estonia’s alerts to find out if they’re accepting applicants from the US or any other countries.

3. Portugal

The Portugal digital nomad visa is certainly one of the most sought-after because it has a ton of amenities and you can even find a one of the best nomad destinations in Ponta Do Sol.

Ponta do Sol is located in the region of Madeira, which is a beautiful island where you can wake up every morning to breathtaking views of the sea.

Making Madeira Islands one of the leading island destination in Europe.

The cost of living in Portugal is relatively affordable, the median cost of living in Sao Joao da Madeira is around $960 USD and the average cost of rent is $555 USD.

Madiera, Portugal Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$426.74
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$304.81
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$670.59
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$487.7

Cost of Meal and Beverage

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$8.74
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$32.52
Domestic Beer$1.77
Cappuccino $1.48
Data collected from costof.live

Digital nomads who live outside of the European Union need to apply for a Schengen visa or short stay visa – this is effectively the digital nomad visa.

A total of 26 countries also called the Shengen states in the European Union issue Schengen visas for short periods of stay.

The Schengen countries are Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland.

Portugal’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs issues different types of temporary residency visas, and should you be approved for one, you can use that as your Portugal digital nomad visa. 

4. Croatia

Croatia is a beautiful, high-income country that ranks high in quality of life and the country is steeped in beautiful sights, history, and culture.

Bordered by Hungary and Slovenia, Croatia is the perfect place for people who want to experience Europe while in close proximity to the Adriatic Sea.

The median cost of living in the city of Dubrovnik, Croatia is about $1,679/month and the average cost of rent at $1,035 per month.

digital nomad visa

Dubrovnik, Croatia Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$796.44
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$580.36
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$1,544.77
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$856.9

Cost of Meal and Beverage

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$12.71
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$75.24
Domestic Beer$5.95
Cappuccino$3.04
Data collected from Costof.live

The Croatia digital nomad visa is a recent development and was influenced by Estonia’s successful digital nomad visa program.

You can find the Croatia digital nomad visa application form here

Some things you have to know about the Croatia digital nomad visa is that you can only remain for a maximum of 1 year.

And you must be a third-country national who owns a company that does not reside in Croatia, and it must have zero Croatian employees, and you must also show a bank statement, as well as proof of income.

5. Georgia

Georgia is an exquisitely beautiful country in Eastern Europe, and while it’s not super popular yet, it’s bound to become one of the top picks of freelancers.

The cost of living in this side of Eastern Europe is very affordable, in Tbilisi, Georgia the average cost of living is $582 USD, while median rent is $376 USD.

digital nomad visa

Tbilisi, Georgia Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$289.81
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$179.1
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$551.42
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$341.31

Cost of Meal and Beverage

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$5.16
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$18.92
Domestic Beer$0.93
Cappuccino$1.39
Data collected from Costof.live

Georgia doesn’t have a digital nomad visa yet, but the government has already invited qualified freelancers to travel to the country to work there.

Foreign nationals who wish to travel and work in the country will be asked to complete a mandatory application form.

Should the nomad visa be finally offered to foreign nationals, all applicants must first obtain preliminary confirmation from the government.

6. Mexico

Due to the convenience of the location, access to the most beautiful beaches and the affordability of the country, many digital nomads and remote workers are flocking to Mexico to live out their dream life.

The median cost of living in Mexico city is $978 and the average cost of rent is $701.

digital nomad visa

Mexico City, Mexico Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$539.3
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$334.86
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$1,136.77
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$739.77

Cost of Meal and Beverage

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$5.06
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$28.44
Domestic Beer$2.17
Cappuccino$2.04
Data collected from Costof.live

There is no nomad visa yet, but the requirements for any future digital nomad visa will likely be aligned with the country’s current income requirements.

The Mexican government uses the UMA measure for foreign nationals who wish to apply for residency permits.

A residency visa requirements also include having a stable monthly income and savings in the bank.

7. Antigua & Barbuda

Antigua & Barbuda are Caribbean islands that are perfectly situated between the Atlantic and the Pacific.

Surrounded by miles of ocean, the two islands that comprise this nation are a perfect getaway for digital nomads.

Average Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$1,099.53 
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$740.04
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$1,850.10
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre1,202.57

Cost of Meal and Beverage

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$9.25
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$92.51
Domestic Beer $2.22
Cappuccino$5.18
Data collected from Numbeo.com

Currently, digital nomads may apply for nomad residency at Antigua & Barbuda.

Antigua & Barbuda’s digital nomad visa is called the NDR visa, and it is designed specifically for people who work remotely and have a registered business in another country.

The digital nomad may either be self-employed or employed and pay income taxes in their country of residence. Your work must be carried out through mobile technology.

The digital nomad visa does not provide the remote worker the right to apply for a job in the country.

If a person is approved, the NDR visa will allow the digital nomad to stay in the country for two years. The application form can be found here.

8. Barbados

Located in the Lesser Antilles, Barbados is another dreamy getaway for tourists and digital nomads.

Barbados has opened its doors to digital nomads who want to stay in paradise while staying productive in one of the most beautiful locations in the Caribbean.

digital nomad visa

Bridgetown, Barbados Average Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$654.19 USD
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$356.83 USD
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$1,229.8 USD
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$698.79 USD

Cost of Meal and Beverage

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$14.87
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$79.30
Domestic Beer $3.47
Cappuccino$3.59
Data collected from Numbeo.com

Barbados currently offers a twelve-month “Barbados Welcome Stamp” for remote workers.

The Barbados Welcome Stamp can be renewed upon expiry and you can view the application form here.

The requirements for working in Barbados as a digital nomad are:

  • Passport sized photograph
  • Bio data page of passport
  • Proof of relationship of dependents

The following non-refundable fees are required upon arrival:

  • Individual – Fee of US $2,000.00 
  • Family Bundle-  Fee US $3,000.00

Duration of Stay: Maximum 12 months from date of approval

The purpose of the Barbados Welcome Stamp is to welcome remote workers and online business owners to experience a less stressful working environment while enjoying the incredible beach towns.

9. Bermuda

Bermuda is a British territory situated in the Atlantic.

The island has always been open to tourism and attractive to digital nomads and other travelers who wish to situate themselves in an island paradise.

The cost of living in Bermuda is higher than in New York and most US cities.

The median cost of living for a single person is $1,812.93 which makes this an expensive island to live in.

digital nomad visa

Hamilton, Bermuda Average Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$2,662.50
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$1,870.00
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$6,171.43
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$4,212.50

Cost of Meal and Beverage

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$40.00 
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$140.00
Domestic Beer $9.00
Cappuccino$5.29
Data collected from Numbeo.com

The island has opened its borders and is welcoming tourists and digital nomads.

They have also created the “Work from Bermuda” program allows nomads to work and study remotely from the island.

Fill up the application form for the program, and you will get a response in five days.

Once you are approved, you must pay a one-time fee of $263.

Note that you will be applying specifically for a Work from Bermuda One Year Residential Certificate.

The requirements for this digital nomad visa are:

  • You must be at least 18 years old
  • Must not have committed a crime in Bermuda or any other nation
  • Possess valid health insurance
  • Be the owner of a business registered outside Bermuda, or is self-employed as a remote worker
  • Must show proof of consistent annual income.

In case you are a student, you must show proof of being engaged in any university program or research.

Approved applicants will receive a Digital Work from Bermuda Certificate.

10. Cayman Islands

With so many amenities like scuba diving, hiking in the subtropical forest, and being one of the culinary capital of the Caribbean, it is easy to see why many nomads have decided to make this island into their next home base.

The cost of living here can be slightly higher than the average cost of living in major US cities.

A single digital nomad may need around $3,800/month to live comfortably.

digital nomad visa

George Town, Cayman Islands Average Rent Per Month

Apartment (1 bedroom) in City Centre$1786.16
Apartment (1 bedroom) Outside of Centre$1448.44
Apartment (3 bedrooms) in City Centre$4427.88
Apartment (3 bedrooms) Outside of Centre$3104.87

Cost of Meal and Beverage

Meal, Inexpensive Restaurant$18.01
Meal for 2 People, Mid-range Restaurant, Three-course$114.07
Domestic Beer $6.00
Cappuccino$5.26
Data collected from Numbeo.com

The Cayman Islands is currently offering the Global Citizen Concierge Program which offers international guests who want to experience the Caymankind way of life while staying productive by being able to live and work from this beautiful island.

If you are approved, you may stay in the Cayman Islands as a digital nomad for up to 24 months.

Click here to view the application form.

Ready to Start your Digital Nomad Journey?

If you enjoy working remotely while exploring the world, get a digital nomad visa in your dream country.

The world is so much bigger and more beautiful than we think, and there’s no better way to experience it than by exploring as a digital nomad.


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