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Ep. 210: How this podcaster helps amplify voices of women of color and build wealth with Danielle Desir

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In this episode, I speak with Danielle Desir who is a 5x author, blogger, podcaster, and founder of The Thought Card, an award-winning affordable-travel and personal finance blog and podcast empowering financially savvy travelers to make informed financial decisions – travel more, pay off debt, and build wealth. 

She is also the co-producer of Millennial Wealth Builders, a 3x grant-funded audio docuseries highlighting women of color building wealth. 

As the founder and CEO of  WOC (Women of Color) Podcasters, Danielle is passionate about supporting and amplifying the voices of women of color podcasters and audio creators.

Listen on to find out how Danielle has helped amplify women of color’s voices and build wealth!

Listen Below:


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Transcription:

Debbie:

Hey everyone! Thank you so much for being here. I am so excited for my guest today. I have Danielle with me. Hey Danielle.

Danielle:

Hey Debbie. It’s a dream to be here. Thank you for having me.

Debbie:

I know. It’s so funny ’cause we’ve been talking for so long and it’s so crazy that we’re just having each other, like on our podcasts right now. But you’ve been busy and I’m usually spaced out with stuff. But I’m so glad you’re here and we’re both super cozy.

So can you tell us about you, Danielle, your story, and why you live an offbeat life?

Danielle:

Yes, absolutely. So I am passionate about helping folks make more informed financial decisions. And I would say that my angle is like helping us to travel more. So I realized that at a pretty young age that money was pretty important in helping us to live the lifestyle that we wanted to live.

 And throughout my life, there have been times where I had opportunities to travel. Like when I was younger, I would travel to Haiti every summer. But then in high school and college, the money wasn’t there or I had no interest in it. So ebbs and flows.

By the time I became an adult and became a graduate student, I realized that, “You know what? If I wanted to make travel a priority in my life and make it happen, I needed to start being strategic, savvy, and creative. So that has been a really big part of my adulthood. And I would say I live an offbeat life because I like to do all the things. So it’s not an either-or, it’s like an and.

 So I travel and paid off debt. I travel and own a home. I travel and do all these different things, which traditionally, sometimes people are like, “No, you can’t do that. You have to focus on one goal at a time.” But I like to focus on multiple goals and that just really lights me up.

Debbie:

I really resonate with that because, you and I, we’re the same. Like, we don’t have parents who are super-rich who’s just going to pay off our travel expenses. I can definitely relate to that. I worked like three to four jobs in college just to travel, that’s what you had to do.

And when I was starting out, that was the thing. Like, I literally worked just to travel and I’m like, “This is not a good way to do it as well.” Like, you don’t want to be broke because then all of your money is going to travel. So for you, Danielle, what was it about that lifestyle? Like making sure that you’re able to balance between the two that you knew you wanted to keep going.

Because I think we have this mentality and we were taught this, but now it’s really great because we see other possibilities. Like, people working remotely and being able to work from anywhere instead of waiting until you’re retired or you’re two-week vacation every year.

So how did you make that happen? How was that transition like because now that’s what you do?

Danielle:

Yes. I would say find inspiration. Find something that lights you up that will give you the ump to keep going. And that for me was actually taking my first solo trip to Paris in 2014.

So I had spent the entire year saving up for that one trip. And that was my first time going to Europe. And when I was there in Paris, it was amazing. It was so just eye-opening that I said to myself, “I want to keep doing this.” And that’s where the creativity comes in.

 It’s like, if your budget is finite, which most of us are, we have finite budgets, how do I make it possible with what I have? So I started to look at cheap flights. I started to figure out better ways to budget. I started to figure out, “Okay, how do I maximize my time with a full-time job?”

So I think finding inspiration and also problem-solving. If there is something in your way, try to understand: How can I push that away? Are there alternatives? That’s really helpful to get started?

Debbie:

Yeah. And for you right now, are you still in your nine to five, Danielle? Because I know you do so many different things, right?

Danielle:

It feels like I’m not in my nine to five but it sure is. I am in my nine to five and it’s definitely helping to fuel my bigger goals. Like, I have goals like paying off my mortgage, goals for saving for retirement. So there is a purpose for the nine to five but I also do so many other things to grow my income as well.

Debbie:

And I love that your story is the way it is because I think a lot of people will think, “Well, I have to leave the nine to five to really get to where I need to be,” but you’re using it. You’re very strategic with what you’re doing. You’re using your nine to five for, like you said, a bigger goal.

Because, let’s be honest, let’s be realistic here, if there’s no money coming in, it doesn’t matter how sweet that life is. It’s going to turn sour if you’re broke and on the street corner somewhere. So I think it’s a really smart thing that you’re doing.

And it’s also sharing and showing to people that you can do this even if you are still in your nine to five. And you’re doing so many things. Every time I see Danielle online, I’m like, “Oh my God, how does this girl do it?”

First of all, let’s talk about the multiple streams of income that you’re doing right now ’cause I just saw your post, I’m like clapping virtually for you. So, Danielle, talk about that. Talk about all of these income streams that you’re creating to actually prepare to leave for your nine to five.

Danielle:

So there are multiple ways for you to grow your net worth or grow your finances. You can reduce expenses but I found that at a certain point, you can’t go any lower. And you can also increase your income. So a lot of what I do is increasing my income and finding opportunities that are in line with my gifts, that are in line with my passions. One of them is actually writing books.

So I love writing books. I’m not going to say I was a natural-born writer ’cause I wasn’t but it was pretty much a value add. So I was writing blogs for years. I would say four years before I felt more confident enough to write a book. But I said to myself, “You know what? If I really focus and spend the time I’m writing free blogs for my community and really package it into an ebook, I can start to make income from this.”

And also the things I love about ebooks is that you can transform your audience in one sitting. I don’t have to write 10 blog posts, I don’t have to compete with the Google algorithm. I can literally talk to you one-to-one, share with you a tip or transformation. And with less than, let’s say $10, you can have a new outlook on life. So for me, I’m all in on ebooks.

And the posts that you’re referring to is that each ebook that you create is also can be a paperback which is, again, another income stream. And now after that, you could actually create audiobooks which is a third income stream. And then after that, people ask you to speak on stage which is a fourth income stream.

So based on packaging your knowledge, you can create so many different types of multiple income streams where you can be more passive, not everything has to be active. You could work on your book one time and now you have all these other passive streams in the background.

Debbie:

That is incredible. And also let’s just, first of all, go back to what you were just talking about. Just with that one idea of writing a book and then y’all just gave her a massive gem right there. Like it’s not a gem, it’s a fricking diamond.

Okay. First of all, you write your ebook, right? You create income from that. Then you make that into a paperback, then you create an audiobook and then you get speaking engagement from that. And also so much more opportunity. So that’s like four right there and probably like a ton more from that.

So I love how your brain works, Danielle, because I think you are definitely one of those people who think outside of the box, right? Who find opportunities where most people probably may not even see it. So how do you actually think about these things? Like how do you find these opportunities that maybe are not really clear for some people? How do you make income from nothing?

Danielle:

It’s not necessarily a linear trajectory. So I’m six years in as a blogger now but when I was just starting, I couldn’t see the path. But I think being consistent in whatever kind of content that you’re creating is very helpful because you can start to transform that consistency and put that energy towards other things.

So for me, when I first started as a blog, it wasn’t an income stream or income generator for me. But over time I built confidence to be a writer. I said, “You know what? I could write blogs so why don’t I try to package it into a book?”

My first book is out there but I don’t really promote it because it’s embarrassing. It’s not the best work I’ve done but it’s out there and it’s an income stream. And I think once you do something once, you realize how easy it is that you can continue to do it.

And when it comes to creativity, I’m always thinking about, “Okay, how can I repurpose this?” Or “How can I bring this idea to a new audience?” Because not everyone is going to like audiobooks. They may like a course. So maybe I do want to create a course or workshop, right? Or maybe the audiobook isn’t a good fit but they’ll like reading instead.

So it’s trying to figure out different ways that you could say the same thing to different people in different types, in different forms.

Debbie:

Yeah. That is really important to do because it’s really figuring out what your audience wants and how they intake content is so crucial to all of that. I mean, just looking at Instagram alone, there are different ways people really get their content. And now we have audio-based, video-based, image-based, written-based.

So if you’re doing that with your own content and how you’re selling, that is such a great idea what Danielle was talking about. And I think just thinking outside of the box and really figuring out what works and what your audience wants is so important.

Just to give you, guys, context, this is like one of the first times I’m doing video with my podcast. So I’m seeing Danielle I’m like, “Yes, Danielle, what’s up?”

Danielle:

My hand is raised. I’m like “One more thing.”

I just want to give you an example of how I’m thinking about creating an income stream. So I was recently asked to speak at a summit and I was a paid speaker which was great. But that topic kind of pushed me outside of my comfort zone where I was talking about something that I personally know but I haven’t mapped it out step-by-step.

So now after I finished creating the presentation, I did it live, I was able to capture down some of the questions that my attendees had so that I can improve that presentation again. Now I can either do a workshop with that presentation where I package it to my own audience, I can create a course from that, or audio courses are the new thing.

So I would say just keeping an eye to see what trends are out there because everyone is chasing courses, no one is chasing audio courses. And there’s a lot of companies that are doing that right now. So you can create something one time, like I mentioned, presentation and package that into multiple offers to different groups.

One of the things that I struggle with sometimes is like, I don’t want my people to see the same thing over and over again but it doesn’t have to be. You can market to your people but also you could market it elsewhere to other communities as well.

So just wanted to add that as just like how I think about taking one piece of content and helping so many more people and creating more income streams from that.

Debbie:

Yeah. And that’s the beauty about repurposing. Also, if you think about it that way, there’s an audience that you have on one platform but they may not be on the other platform. So you can always take that and put it in another one.

So for example, if you posted that on Instagram, your Facebook may not have the same type of people. So that’s fresh and new content right there. So I think sometimes we really overthink things and that stops us from actually doing anything.

I’m like, “I would rather see the same content on two different platforms than not doing anything.” So yeah, I have been guilty of that before. So now I just don’t care anymore. I’m just like, “This is good shit! I’m going to post this everywhere.”

Danielle:

I love it. I love that energy. Yes.

Debbie:

So one of the things that I really heard from my audience and also talking to other people is having security, right? Having security with your income, with your lifestyle, and all of that. And it’s so interesting that before COVID, before the pandemic, what we’re doing, people were scared of it, right?

A lot of people didn’t want to do this. They’re like, “Are you crazy? Why would you work remotely? That’s just not secure.” And now the tides have turned, everyone. What we do is more secure than your regular nine to five because you can lose that but what Danielle is doing, she has like a hundred multiple streams of income. So if she loses one, she’s like, “Hey, I still got this.”

So how do you feel about that? How do you feel about that word security? Because that is something that we all strive to have and you’re definitely doing it yourself. What does that mean to you?

Danielle:

I would say, for me, security is being confident in my situation right now, my ability to take the next step, or do something in the future. So it’s also kind of fleeting because today I may feel secure but then tomorrow I may wake up and I may not feel as secure for whatever reason

So I think for me, when I’m striving for security is knowing that no matter what I’m going to be okay. No matter what, I’m going to be able to take care of myself, take care of my family, and be able to create. When I was growing up, I didn’t see myself as a creator but I definitely do feel like I’m a creator now because I know that I can not only create things, create widgets, but also create income.

And I take every success, every win, every product launch that’s successful or not successful, ’cause sometimes they don’t always work out, as just another stepping stone for me to continue to push the movement forward.

Debbie:

Yeah, absolutely. And you made a really good point there. Creating doesn’t just have to be painting things, music, or anything like that. It could be, like you said, creating income. Like, being really creative with how you do that. That’s just a different way of using your brain and you mentioned this before, it’s not linear. Like, when you’re starting to think outside of the box, then you become so much more creative. I love that. That’s a good way of thinking about it.

So Danielle, now that you’re creating all of these different types of income and you’re trying to really make yourself more sustainable, this lifestyle more sustainable before you do leave your nine to five, how are you finding your clients? How are you making sure that you’re attracting the right people and also making money from that?

Danielle:

So there are a couple of things that I do. In addition to writing books, I do freelance writing. But at the core it’s all writing, right? It doesn’t matter if it’s for a client or for yourself or for a book. It’s all the same skill of writing. Finding freelance clients for me has been networking and relationship building.

So a lot of the people who I let’s say admire or have gone in their program as a coaching client or something like that, those are the people who I’m reaching out to and telling them, “Hey, I am a freelance writer. Are you looking for freelance writing services?”

I don’t just stop there. I literally dissect what they’re doing and tell them, “You’re not doing this. I feel like I can help you. So I make sure that I am really leading with value and I’m taking the time to come up with a plan for them so that they can say yes for me.

It’s not just, “Hey, I’m a freelance writer. Do you want to book me?” No, it’s like, “Hey, I noticed that you’re not optimizing search engine optimization,” or “Hey, I noticed that your blog is lacking. Here are a couple of ideas just to kind of get you interested in it.

And now a lot of my clients are saying yes. Like, people I’m approaching just like kind of cold, I’m like, “Just trying to see if you’re interested.” They’re like, “Yeah,” because I think the network is there, been in their network, I’m familiar with what they’re doing. And secondly, I came in with a plan for them. So all they have to do is book me and pay me. So, that I think is super helpful.

Debbie:

And when you do know what you’re doing, that always helps, right? Also, Danielle is a massive action taker. She’s doing so many different things and she shows up every time. You’re super consistent with what you do and you also have a really great community as well. So that’s a really helpful thing when you’re able to build that.

For someone who is just starting out, or even when you started out, Danielle, and you didn’t have this background yet, right? Because, like you were saying, writing is really not something that you thought you would go into and it really became a passion for you.

How do you build that confidence to make sure that you keep going, or even when you are approaching people and it’s your first few times, how do you make sure that you’re doing it the right way?

Danielle:

I would say being consistent is so important. As a blogger, when I first started, it was all about just creating one piece of new content a week. That was all I was tasked to do for myself. And also not looking at other people and trying to compare your productivity to their productivity because if I was trying to compare it to a full-time travel blogger, I would be discouraged, I would have quit.

But I said, “Okay, Danielle, this is your lane. You can commit to one article a week and make time for that one article a week.” And at the end of the year, I had like 52 articles. I hope my math is right but yes, I had all these articles, and every year I just built on that. So year one is 52, year two is a hundred plus, year three… And that was really helpful to build that consistency and flex that muscle.

And then I invested in conferences, I invested in courses. But for me, I like conferences a little better because it’s for a short amount of time and I have to show up and not kind of just be left to my own devices. But investing in my learning is very important. Like podcasts are great but sometimes you need that step by step and investing in a coaching program, investing in a book, investing in a course, that is going to really solidify your next step.

And then last but not least, getting paid for your work, for me, is very motivating and it’s a validation. It’s like someone is willing to pay me for the things that I create and produce. And over time I’ve been able to increase my rate because I’ve shown up and I’ve created content and it’s consistent.

And I also think if you have an angle to the kind of stuff that you create, like for me, I really corner the affordable travel market which makes me a gem. Like, not a lot of people are talking about affordable travel and personal finance. But because I’ve done this for so long, I have become the go-to expert, which means that I can also charge more.

Debbie:

It just takes you actually doing it and showing up. And I think most people see what you’re doing, Danielle, and like, “How did you get to that point?” And then they’re only in like the two months of it and they’re like, “How come I’m not doing the same?” Like, “Dude, you just started two months ago. What the hell are you talking about?”

If everything just happened when you wanted it to happen, you wouldn’t be ready for it, right? All of these things really serve the purpose of you figuring it out, making sure that you are actually ready for that moment. Because if it happens, you see this all the time, I’m going off on a tangent, but with lottery winners who just win like hundreds of millions of dollars. And then like five years later, they lose the money, right?

Danielle:

True.

Debbie:

But if it goes into the hands of someone who knows what to do, they double, triple, quadruple that money. That’s how I think about it just to make myself feel better. In times like that, Danielle.

Danielle:

And I think it’s looking at your own progress. Like, we could look at other people but we don’t know the behind the scenes but you know the behind-the-scenes of your life. So you can look back and like, “Oh my gosh.” The other day I was reading some blog posts from 2015 and I was like, “Oh my God, this is awful.”

But this is what it took. It took me being awful to be at this point today. And I just always think about like, “I wonder people who follow me in 2015 to 2021. Now they must be like, ‘Oh my gosh.'” But it’s just takes showing up, being willing to be messy, and be imperfect in front of people.

Because if I wasn’t publishing my work, I would have never gotten feedback, I would never have opportunities to improve. Even your clients can help you improve. Like, whenever I’m working with a new client, I’m always like, “Hey, is there anything that I can do better? How can I improve?” And that all of those things help you to be better.

Debbie:

Yeah. Absolutely. It just takes time, that’s the thing, there’s really no magic to this. It just takes time, effort, energy, blood, sweat, and tears, investing in yourself. That’s another thing that you talked about. That’s so important. And I think a lot of people feel like, and I felt like this too, we can Google everything, we could just ask questions but if you want to ask the questions that you want to ask, the people that are going to know, they are going to ask you for money.

You can’t just do the “pick your brain” stuff. First of all, that’s BS. So pay for it, it’s going to come back to you tenfold. Believe me and Danielle. Like, I did the same thing. Once I started investing that’s when it started to turn because it literally takes them years to figure this stuff out. And it’s kind of like the shortcut that we all want, right?

Yes. And the investment is not an expense. It feels like an expense but an investment will have a return. And a lot of times we can’t look at the expert and be like, “Well, I got their program and it didn’t work.” Well, did you do everything that is said, step-by-step? Did you take advantage of all your resources to make that money back?

It’s a wonderful feeling to know when you invest in something and then like a month later or two months later, or maybe even a year later, you’re like, “Oh, that investment led me down this path which makes me such a better XYZ.”

Debbie:

Yeah, absolutely.

So let’s talk about your travels, Danielle, because one of the first things that I found out about you was through your podcasts. We got featured in some articles and I know that you have a travel podcast. What is it like for you to be able to travel around and create income and also share this with a lot of people?

Because I think it’s so interesting to be in this type of space. And you’re also able to travel the world on a budget. And a lot of people think that you need to have a massive amount of income to enjoy life.

Danielle:

Yes. It’s one of my favorite things. And I think what makes, the times we’re living in, the pandemic, really difficult right now is because we can’t get up and go as much. But it’s just so liberating and inspires me to create. Like, the new settings, the new foods, the people, the differences inspire me to get out there and go.

And with a nine to five, it is challenging. It could be challenging because you have limited vacation time, not only limited vacation time, but also your time in the office. Sometimes, like for me, my job is cyclical. So I can’t leave because I’m in the middle of something. They need me, right?

Debbie:

Yeah.

Danielle:

But I think it’s about finding those times. So one of the things I always say is like, “You have 52 weekends in a year. Not every weekend needs to be on the couch, watching Netflix. Some weekends could actually be doing something that lights you up and something that inspires you. ”

And even now, even though I’m not necessarily traveling, but I may take some time in the weekend to like, look at AirBnBs and just feel the field or take like a virtual tour or something like that. So I think inspiration is really important and it just helps me feel my creativity and just show up as a better person.

Debbie:

Yeah. I’m the same way. I know I’ve been doing that lately ’cause I’m like, “I’m having the travel bug but we can’t really go anywhere.” I was looking at AirBnBs, I’m like, “Oh my God, this place is so awesome.”

Danielle:

Beautiful. So amazing. Even for like designing my office. My office is bare right now but it’s like, “You get so much inspiration.” It can translate to other parts of your life too.

Debbie:

I’m like, “Damn it. When can I go to this place?” And it’s so cheap right now. Isn’t that the most ironic thing, right? The best time to travel…

Danielle:

It’s a trap.

Debbie:

Right? It is.

Oh my gosh. I can’t even. I don’t want to go into this because then it’ll just be like, “Damn it…”

So, Danielle, when you actually did, when we all did, when we all traveled abroad, what type of travel insurance were you using?

Danielle:

To be honest, I did not use travel insurance. Not at all. I would actually rely on my credit cards. So like whatever insurance or whatever, like liability covers that I had in my credit cards, I would just go with that. So I’m not a model citizen.

Debbie:

I definitely hear you on that. But I think, especially with what’s happening now, people have been like, “Oh my God, I need to have insurance,” because there were like issues when COVID was first starting out. And there were a lot of travel insurances that didn’t cover during the pandemic, right?

So finding your insurance when you’re in a steady location is really hard enough but it’s even harder when you’re on the road. And also when I do that, I get super confused by all the requirements and what I need to do to process claims. For me, that’s like boring stuff.

That’s why I’m so glad. I found Integra Global who has the most incredible customer service to have 24/7 help. And you can submit a claim through their app and your claims are managed by their in-house global expert teams who are able to handle any issues which means less stress and panic.

And also for me, who is someone who doesn’t really understand all of this stuff, I’m like, “Oh my God, I don’t know.” So it’s super helpful. So if you’re interested, go to IntegraGlobal.com for more details. Again, that’s IntegraGlobal.com. I think they’re awesome.

They also helped a ton of people during the pandemic because they also cover things that you didn’t even know you would be using because who the hell knew this? Like, whatever was going to happen, right? Oh my God, I’m so glad that we have this company.

So for you, Danielle, since you’ve been doing so many different things with your life, you’re getting ready to leave your nine to five, right? And there are so many ups and downs with these whole things but I’m pretty sure it’s also super, super fulfilling.

I want you to fast forward to like 30 to 40 years from now, maybe even 50, and you’re looking back at your life, what legacy do you want to leave and what do you want to be remembered for?

Danielle:

Yes. I want to be remembered as the person that helped pave the way to thinking about financial independence and financial freedom. I know that it’s a hard journey. Not everyone may be able to get there, but I want to be the person that sparks inspiration. Like, sparks that we can live differently, that we can create our own futures. And I think sometimes that’s all you need to get going – that spark.

I’ve been fortunate to have a lot of people inspire me in different shapes and forms. So I just want to continue to be that inspiration for not only my family but also for other people who I can touch.

Debbie:

And you also have a ton of content that will definitely spark a lot of that.

Danielle:

A lot of inspiration.

Debbie:

Yes, exactly.

So Danielle, before we say goodbye, I have five rapid questions for you that you can answer with one sentence. Are you ready?

Danielle:

Sounds good. Yes, let’s do it.

Debbie:

Alright, Danielle, what has been the best money you’ve ever spent while you were abroad and why?

Danielle:

I would say tasting coffee in different destinations, all over the world. Like, I literally spent $50 in coffee in Iceland for a four-day trip. I’m that person. So I really do enjoy diving into food, drinks, and just the food. So that is definitely a good investment whenever I can.

Debbie:

I agree with you on the food thing. I love food so much. I could have a whole blog, podcasts, everything, just on food but like eating it. I don’t know, mukbang style.

So describe what your ideal day looks like for you, Danielle.

Danielle:

Oh, that’s a good one. So I would wake up, I would have a cup of coffee, and have deep writing. Like, being able to sit down and write, maybe work on a new book, break for mid-morning snack or breakfast, and workout. So either go for a long run or have a Peloton now. So use my Peloton or just jump rope or something just get some activity going.

And then just being able to relax and maybe read, support other creatives by consuming their content. And I would love to end the day with a coaching call. So being able to like do one-on-ones with like my clients or just be able to be part of a community.

I think that is like an awesome, awesome day. So make money in the morning, make money at night.

Debbie:

Like, “Right in the smack of this is stuff that I really like.”

Danielle:

Yes.

Debbie:

So I love that balance between the two. That’s good.

So where is the best location to live, do you think, as a remote worker?

Danielle:

I would say Lisbon, Portugal because there’s like the beach and the water, still good food and affordable for European standards, and sunny. And it’s beautiful. It’s really beautiful. But I also do like Iceland but Iceland is way more expensive.

Debbie:

Super expensive.

Danielle:

Super expensive but it’s just I could imagine the inspiration.

Debbie:

Yeah.

Danielle:

Like, the landscape, being able to just literally step out of your cottage and just happen to a glacier lagoon. That’s just amazing. So yeah, those are the two places.

Debbie:

If Iceland wasn’t so expensive, I guess everybody would live there. Maybe there’s a reason why. But it’s so beautiful. We were there a few years ago and I was looking at people’s houses and there are literally waterfalls behind. Like, their backyard has a fricking waterfall. I’m like, “Oh my God, this is so crazy.”

Danielle:

It’s literally. I’ve been there three times and I’m just itching to go back because I haven’t been anywhere like it. Like, just being able to be out there, the nature, the glaciers, the volcanoes, the black sand beaches, all of that. It’s just truly incredible

Debbie:

In a way, I’m like, “Is this what heaven would look like? Right?

Danielle:

A rainbow comes into view.

Debbie:

A double rainbow. I’m like, “Is this what heaven is like?” Oh my God, guys, I think we found it. When we die, this is awesome.

Danielle:

Truly amazing.

Debbie:

So, Danielle, if you could have a superpower, what would it be?

Danielle:

Wow. I think it would probably be invisibility. Like, I would want to just kind of slide in different places and be like a fly on the wall, imaginary, that they don’t even know. Like, that’s kind of like as interesting as being able to telekinesis, getting people’s heads. Being in the room is very important. So I would love to do that.

Debbie:

Go to big CEOs, how are they making their money? What are they investing in? Come on. Like, people like us need to hear this stuff. Alright, If that ever happens, Danielle, obviously, you let us know, put it in the blog.

Danielle:

Yes.

Debbie:

Write it in your ebook.

Danielle:

You, guys, get into cut.

Debbie:

Last question: what’s the one thing that you wish you did sooner?

Danielle:

Oh, that’s a tough one. I wish that I maybe would have gone this route, like be a creative, sooner. I think what happens when you have a nine to five and you’re focusing on growing that career and then you end up realizing, “Wait, I want to be an entrepreneur.” It’s like, you spent so much time building other houses for other people and you could’ve been taking that time to build your own house.

So I remember distinctly when I was younger, I was looking for a job. And at the time, right out of grad school, I could have taken a year to like travel the world, or I could have done a remote year or did something else. But I was like, “You know what? I need that traditional nine to five, let me get started.”

And I wonder sometimes what life would’ve been like if I just would’ve done something else. But here we are, right? I still feel like I get to craft my future. But I do wonder, I’d wonder about that sometimes.

Debbie:

Yeah. But as they say: better, late than never, right?

Danielle:

Yes. Absolutely.

Debbie:

Good that you’re able to do this now.

Well, thank you so much, Danielle. I love talking to you ’cause you’re just amazing. I love your energy and we are so appreciative for you to be here on the show. If our listeners want to know more about you, where can they find you?

Danielle:

Yes, absolutely. So head over to my podcast, The Thought Card Podcast, which is an affordable travel and personal finance podcast. Also, ThoughtCard.com is my blog, and connect with me on social. So, thethoughtcard on Twitter. I’m very active on Twitter and @thedanielledesir on Instagram.

Debbie:

Awesome. Thank you so much, Danielle, again, for being here. We really appreciate you.

Danielle:

Thank you, Debbie. This was a dream, truly. Thanks.

GET THE EXTENDED INTERVIEW WITH DANIELLE WHERE SHE SHARES HOW TO NEGOTIATE WORKING FROM HOME.


Show Credits:

Audio Engineer: Ben Smith


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