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Ep. 168: How this former teacher became a successful food vlogger with Jessica Hirsch

In this week’s episode, I speak with Jessica who is the founder of @CheatDayEats and @YourRoomService which highlights the food and travel that she has photographed all over the world. 

In just a little over 5 years, Jessica has built an audience that reaches over 3 million on a weekly basis through her organic feeds that are a showcase of her own personal experiences.  

Not only is she passionate about her brand, but she’s also dedicated to helping other brands, businesses, and destinations grow. 

Listen on to find out how Jessica uses her passion for food to become a successful food vlogger.

Listen Below:

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Transcription:

Debbie:

Hey everyone! Thank you so much for joining us. I’m so excited to be here with Jessica. Hey, Jessica, how are you? 

Jessica:

Good, Debbie. How are you? 

Debbie:

I am wonderful. So can you tell us a little bit more about you and why you live an offbeat life? 

Jessica:

Yes, I’m excited to tell you guys about it. So, I’m Jessica. I run Cheat Day Eats, Your Room Service, and Hot Buns Club. So, three social media channels where I cover food, travel, lifestyle, fitness, everything in between. All kinds of centering around me and my love of food and photography. 

Debbie:

Yeah. Well, you have a really interesting brand because you are this incredibly beautiful girl and you are not afraid to eat, right? And, I think, for a lot of people, they think that if they are going to be in this industry it’s all about working out. But you’re like, “No. You can also enjoy amazing food for yourself. 

Jessica:

Actually, one of the things that I’ve been really passionate about always was fitness. So, the name  Cheat Day Eats blends itself to that – that fitness world. It’s kinda funny, when I started the account, I was all food and now I’ve integrated myself. I got a lot of questions like, “Oh you don’t eat that ”, “How do you eat that?”, and “Stay fit.”

So that’s been kind of 2020 goals, answering those questions even more. And we started answering them but I find that I’m answering that question a lot. So it’s definitely something people are interested in. 

I find that a lot of people are, like myself a few years, afraid to have these indulgent meals. It’s all about balance for me. So, I love to kinda educate, like, what I do in my daily routine and how I’m all about sitting on these indulgent foods and being able to balance it.

Debbie:

The fact that your name is “cheap”, for Cheat Day Eats, says a lot about it. Because this is not the type of food that obviously you eat every single day. Otherwise, you won’t be healthy at all but I love the fact that you really promote this, like, you don’t have to have anything lacking in there.

It has to be a balance in your life and it’s not just about all healthy, healthy, healthy. And you can indulge yourself like you’re showing us, right? And if you do it, do it the right way. 

Jessica:

Right. It’s really interesting. I actually came out of college and I became a personal trainer. I was super into health and fitness and I always would have this one cheat day. And that was what inspired my page in the first place.

And as my account grew and I was having more of these, I wouldn’t say unhealthy, indulgent meals more often, I was really nervous. I was like, “How am I going to do this and stay fit?” And it was all about my mindset and changing.

From having this huge meal or meals on my cheat day and being able to have a few bites of a few different dishes while I’m out of the restaurant and if I’m full I need to stop. And I could do those two or three days a week and be able to indulge in these dishes but not go overboard. 

So, it’s funny how I’m actually having more cheat days but I’m actually being healthier about it because I’m listening more to my body.

Debbie:

Absolutely. And you talked about this: about how people are asking you these questions now and how you can actually create this balance and still look the way you do, Jess. Because, obviously, you’re this gorgeous person.

Jessica:

Thank you.

Debbie:

You’re in the public eye and a lot of people will comment on that. It’s like, “No, you’re not really eating this – it’s not true.” How do you usually handle when things like that are thrown in your way?

 When people don’t believe you or there’s like a backlash to certain things because that will happen, right? Because you have a ton of followers who are really there to look at everything that you do.

Jessica:

 Yeah. And I think that I am very proud to say that I have a very positive community. But when people do ask me, I do think it’s coming from a place of genuine, like, “How is this happening? The way that she’s eating all those dishes.”

I do want to be clear that a lot of times,  I’m at a restaurant and I’ll be with maybe a few people and we each take a turn taking a photo and there might be a few dishes on the table and I did actually take it. A bite or two of each or maybe I did finish one of the dishes but that doesn’t mean I finished everything on the table.

It’s really important to me that nothing goes to waste. We always take home leftovers, we give them to the homeless. Like if I’m working on the photoshoot, it goes to staff. So, I think it’s really important for people to know the backstory. And a lot of times I do BTS in my stories, but they might miss that at that time.

So, I always take the time out of my day to answer the people who are commenting on my posts or stories whether it’d be DMs. I will spend 5-10 minutes and answer all these questions because I think it’s really important for people to realize that I’m not finishing 15 dishes by myself. I’m with a group of friends. Nothing is wasted

And I’m only posting food that I love. So yes, I did try it but that doesn’t mean, like, I finished the entire thing. A lot of people see the photo and they don’t realize and they’re thinking, “Oh, it was just a snapshot,” like, I took a photo, and then I walked away from the table and wasted all the food. 

I think it’s important that I’m telling a bigger story. And so, for 2020, just maybe doing a few more YouTubes and talking about. Showing BTS, I think people love to see it. And then, it’s also important to realize the full story here.

My page is all about what to eat on your cheat day but no, I’m not sitting there 50 dishes and finishing everything on my own.  

Debbie:

Well, at the end of the day, we all have to realize that this is part of your business. It’s part of your work. And, obviously, in order for you to create this incredible content, you have to use the props, right? And your prop is food, really good looking food, and really tasteful food. 

And I think a lot of people think that most of these things are the reality and, obviously, part of it is but not everything. And it’s business at the end of the day. As an entrepreneur, this is what you do.

Jessica:

Right. And it is for me. When I get to sit down at a restaurant, I want to order a few dishes and probably more than I would if I was just going out to dine. Because, for me, I’m showcasing the restaurant to my audience. So the more that I order I can taste different things and have a better sense of what the restaurant offers besides ordering one dish.

So, I feel like, for me, there is that balance of how much should I order so then, I’ll be out of the shop. But then, for me, it gives a better sense of what can I say to my audience, “Is this a great restaurant? We’ll find out with one dish.” It might not be the best representation of what they have to offer.

So, yes, I think because this is l my business, I end up worrying. “How do I eat more than someone normally should?” But it allows me to be able to tell a bigger story and represent that restaurant on a deeper level, I guess, and say to my audience, “Okay, here are some of the dishes you should try.”

 If I just have 1 dish, I feel like it’s not as much of an interest to me or my followers. 

Debbie:

Absolutely. 

Jessica:

And I’m gonna say that I’m in the right place that I don’t want to order a few.

Debbie:

Well, you’re in the right industry for that because you just order everything. 

Now, let’s go back to when you started because, obviously, you didn’t think that this was going to be what you were going to do as a career, as a business. I don’t think most of us who started in our industry knew that this was going to happen. 

How did you decide to do this full-time? What was that journey like for you? What was that opportunity like that actually become your full-time gig?

Jessica:

Yes, it’s really quite funny because I was going to school to become a high school math teacher. This is going back 12 years ago. When started my account I was actually a high school math teacher for a few years at this point  

And then, I saw, I was like, “Wow, there’s this community of people who are just as obsessed with food and travel as I am.” And I was that person in my friend group who’s like the weird one taking photos of food and wanted to travel the world.

And so, I was like, “I felt like I found my community,” and so I started taking photos on my phone and posting them on Instagram. My account at that time was actually called chocolate and cheese please one. Yeah, it’s terrible.

About one month in I came up with Cheat Day Eats and I was like, “Wow! This is perfect.” Because it describes, like I was mentioning to you, fitness has always been a really big part of my life. And the name kind of put in fitness and food. And the travel aspect came in a little bit later to you in a little bit later. 

What happened was that there was a great community in New York City: food photographers and food influencers. And they started having events, restaurants picked up pretty quickly on this and started inviting us in. My account just started to grow really quick and it was really exciting for me.

 And that’s when I invested in a Sony camera and started to invest time in the art of photography and videography and learn. I just studied different YouTube and just taught myself everything I know today. Because, for me, I noticed that when I put up a great photo I’ll get more engagement and that was really exciting to me.

Early on I noticed content was key and I think that is definitely something to help me grow. Instagram has changed a lot over the years and it’s just always staying ahead of the curve.

So, going back: I was a high school math teacher, I started my account, it started to grow, restaurants were inviting me in. I still remember the first time I got a paid opportunity and I was like, “Wow! Someone’s gonna pay me to post on Instagram.” I think it was $150 and I was really excited.

I mean, I had a full-time job at this point but I was like, “This is so crazy.” I remember my first press trip I was like, “Someone’s sending me to the Bahamas because of Instagram?,” which is so wild to me. 

And what was really the thing that started to separate me and realize that, “Okay, this is actually something that can be a full-time job,” is a lot of restaurants had seen the social media following that I have grown myself and hired me to create content for them, and run their social media.

So, I became a social media manager for five restaurants I think at the time. And so, I was teaching, going to events, and running for restaurants. And it was a lot. I felt like I was living a double life not to mention that nobody, at this point, knew my account that I work with. 

And I had about 250 thousand followers, maybe 300 thousand and no one knew about it. Not my students, not the faculty. So, I really did feel like I left and I was this other person. The restaurants, obviously, were paying me per month plus I was getting sponsored opportunities and they were definitely more than the $150 I started with.

I just really started to invest, bill up, and save money from what I was earning on Instagram and from being a teacher. In the last year, now I’ve been full-time for two and a half years, it was really hard to manage both and my account was growing so quickly. 

And I was turning down deals because I was a high school math teacher and obviously I had my plate full. And I was not able to take the time that I needed during the day or take press trips because I, obviously, can’t just leave. I couldn’t take time off because, as a teacher, you only get specific days off.

And I had to turn down a trip to Australia and that was the moment I was like, “This is it.” I’m too passionate about this business that I’m building and I felt like teaching is something I can always go back to. I have one life and I want to live it and I’m super passionate about everything I’ve built.

I never felt like I doubted myself or worried. I just kind of leaped right into it. 

Debbie:

Well, you have a really incredible story because you had this life that you had built, right? You went to school for it, you have this whole career going, and then, all of a sudden, out of just from your passions and your hobby, you were able to create this business which is incredible. And completely different from what you were doing before.

From a math teacher to, now, being a content creator taking photos of incredible food, traveling all over the world. 

Jessica:

It is wild.

Debbie:

Yeah, it’s really crazy, right? Because growing up, we were never taught that this type of career was possible and for you to have created this for yourself and to actually live it, right? It’s a dream come true.

Jessica:

It is.

Debbie:

When you finally transitioned and left that job that you worked so hard to get and you knew that there was no other way you could actually stay there because there was something that you really wanted to do which was content creation and doing this business. 

What was that moment? What was that decision like? What was your “what now?” moment like after you finally kind of handed in your resignation letter and was like, “Peace out”? 

Jessica:

Yeah. I mean it kind of reminds me of the last day of high school. Like senior year, throwing my papers up in the air like, “Woohoo,” I honestly felt accelerating because I was able to throw myself fully into this business that I knew that once I’m able to do that I would be more successful.

I was never nervous. I had a lot of things in place that made me feel safe. For example: I was going to be paid out for the rest of the summer. So, I ended in June in the US and I’m paid till September. We have saved up enough. I was getting paid from the restaurant. We already had our summer plans in case we ended up traveling for like 2 months that summer.

So, I just felt like this sense of excitement and power. Like I was able to actually take control over the business and really put my all in.

Debbie:

Well, you also made sure that everything was in place. 

Jessica:

Exactly.

Debbie:

You didn’t just leave without having any back-up plan because I think I hear that from a few people, “I just want to leave and then I’m just hoping that something sticks.” And I think that you need a little bit of something, I mean, I’m not saying that that never works out, but most of the time it really doesn’t unless you really plan this out accordingly. 

Otherwise, you’re going to be going back to add a job, which there’s nothing wrong with that, but if you want to make this sustainable, it has to be something that you know. you can do in the long-term. And you were really able to do that.

Jessica:

Yeah, I think, for me, I was already hustling. While I was a teacher, I ran five different restaurant accounts plus doing sponsored posts. So, like, all my extra time was already going towards building this business. 

So, once I was not teaching I felt like I had that more time to put towards the efforts to make more connections, build those relationships with brands that I’ve already worked with. I continue to partner with them.

And so, at that point, we left our upper east side apartment. Obviously we weren’t paying rent which is like $3,000 in New York city. So that was definitely something that we don’t have to worry about anymore and that’s huge, obviously.

So, count all those months that we lived in the city, it’s scary how much you spend on rent in New York City. It just felt freeing, like, we were able to manage our time towards the opportunities that kinda helped us become successful. 

Debbie:

And you were able to also make sure that you had income coming in from running the social media account. How were you able to find these jobs? Did you pitch them or did they find you?

Jessica

It’s actually funny because they came to me and kind of one leading into the other. So its all word-of-mouth. And so, I had, like I’ve mentioned, five restaurants and actually now I am so busy with my own business that I decided to kind of let that part of my business go. 

Once in a while we’ll pick up a few restaurants and help them get started. And we do content creation for a lot of restaurants but running their social, I just felt like I was really time-consuming. So, now that I have built my business to the point where I don’t have to do that anymore, that’s not something I’m super interested in.

At this point, I love consulting and getting them off the ground but doing the daily posting and commenting is something that I felt not worth my time at this point. But that is something that really did allow me to say, “Hey, I’m a teacher. I started building that business – word of mouth.”

People heard about me from one of the restaurants I started with and it just kinda got the ball rolling. It was a really fun part of leaving teaching and I really did enjoy working with the restaurants. But at the end of the day, I don’t think that a lot of restaurants have a budget that makes it worth it, how much effort goes into it.

Debbie:

Yeah. It’s definitely a lot of work and I think it’s underestimated how much you do as a content creator for you to actually make any money in this industry to do that. 

Jessica:

Yeah. And I just think that, obviously, I was lucky enough to have grown my business. And Cheat Day Eats when I left, like I said, had lie 300,000 and I was getting a lot of incoming opportunities where the value I was getting for a sponsored post versus a month worth of work for a restaurant just didn’t equate.

Debbie:

So, now, when you are working with brands and, obviously, it’s a lot different when you first started, how were you able to find brands to work with and how are you able to do that now as a content creator? 

Jessica:

Back in the day, I did do a lot of outreach. I was never afraid. And I tell people who message me all the time like, “How do I start? I’m building this brand.” Obviously, content is key and you just gotta put yourself out there. 

Even when I was teaching, whenever I have a lunch break or coffee in the morning before I go to school, I try to do a few outreaches and go to the companies that I want to work with that I use on a daily basis. 

And I was reaching out often and now I’m lucky that there are, obviously, so many websites now that connect big brands with our businesses. We got it mostly incoming and at this point something that I’m honored to have ongoing relationships with a lot of companies that we do sponsor work with more often. 

Debbie:

When you are in this journey right now, throughout your whole journey, even now as an entrepreneur, what has been the biggest setback that you encountered and how do you handle them? 

Jessica:

I don’t think of anything as a setback, to be honest. I feel like we’ve had a lot of, like, just really positive experiences. I think, for me, it’s always interesting how to make that transition to the next step. For example: there’s always that hesitancy, my account at first was literally food, shops – one after another. 

And making that transition into, “Oh, hey! Should I put more photos of myself in? Let my personality out.”  And I think that was really scary. You might ask a few different people and I’ll give you different advice and I didn’t really know where to go with it. And I went with my gut and I started incorporating myself into my photos. 

Now, my account has more personality and people know who I am and I think that’s really important. And I’m glad I did it when I didn’t. So, I think that was just something that I kind of struggled with and I think even now, like, I want to go more into fitness and tell more of that story. Like how I incorporated into my brand and people are used to seeing something on my page.

So, it’s always a scary moment like, “Should I do it? How do I do it?” And I always think if it’s something that you’re passionate about, just do it and people are gonna respond to it. And if they’re not interested then, make them not follow.

Debbie:

Absolutely. There’s so much second-guessing ourselves, right? And there’s so much fear before you finally take that leap. But I think, with you, you’ve done so many of these things already that you didn’t even expect out of yourself that now, it’s starting to become second nature. 

Jessica:

It’s funny how even at this point, I have over 400,000 followers, I still get nervous. Because, for me, it’s all about community and you want people to like what you’re doing. So, it’s like, “Well, if I put this photo out, will they like it?” 

But it’s always about, at the end of the day, if you’re passionate about it,  people feel it and they are going to receive it well.

Debbie:

I think there’s so much more pressure with you, Jessica, too because you do have a lot more eyes looking at you. And, I think, you have more freedom when there are not that many people following you, right? Because it’s like, “Okay, there’s just only a few hundred people,” but when you have hundreds of thousands, it can be nerve-racking especially if it’s something that’s so out of the box for you and so different from what you’ve been doing before.

I can definitely see that as being totally nerve-wracking. 

Jessica:

Yeah. But you know what? Just do it and it doesn’t work, you learn from it. And that’s all that happens.

Debbie:

That’s your market speaking to you.

Jessica:

At the end of the day, you’ll just make more posts.

Debbie:

Exactly. I think we’re always panicking about Instagram, but it’s great that you’re able to have that mindset that it’s just like okay, “if it doesn’t work, then there’s another one.” Otherwise, you’re just going to drive yourself nuts and crazy.

Jessica:

Oh, for sure. I mean, it’s so funny especially nowadays with the algorithm, literally, I’m seeing it up and down and I’m like, “Okay, you can’t stress over two months otherwise, you’ll go crazy.”

Debbie:

Absolutely.

So now, when you guys first started your business full-time, what did you actually save before you set off to do this business and how were you able to budget to make that income last?

Jessica: 

So it is interesting because I run this business with Brian, my fiance, my partner, and he became a part of the business actually before I left my teaching job. So in January of 2017 and then I left in June.

And so, we had both of our savings there. Like I said, we stopped renting in New York City so we’re going to be saving all that money every month plus I was getting the same amount from my teaching job till the end of the summer. 

So, I don’t have an exact number for you, but it was definitely something that we were really comfortable leaving at that point. And with the same amount that we were making coming in from the restaurants plus we figured we’d be getting at least 2 sponsored posts per month.

So, we kind of figured it out in that sense. So, I don’t have an exact number for you but something that we were feeling very comfortable with at least for a few months.

Debbie:

Did you have any budgeting tricks that you were able to use to make sure that you didn’t panic and then, all of a sudden, like, you didn’t know where the next meal was coming from?

Jessica: 

Like I said, for me, the restaurant income was key because it was consistent. So, consistent money coming in every single month was the question that I needed considering the fact that, obviously, with sponsored posts, you don’t know when that’s coming.

And for me, I just kept outreaching to restaurants and we were getting a lot of incomings as well at this point which is, obviously, why we felt comfortable leaving. But, now, obviously, we are a two-person team so we have that much more power to be able to continue the work that we were doing in business. And, obviously, both of our savings went into it.

And now, like I said, we left our New York City apartment, so that was $3,000 that we would not have to put towards something every single month and we were able to basically save that.

Debbie:

Yeah. It’s incredible how people will listen to this, Jess, and they’ll think, “$3,000 a month. That’s a mortgage for a lot of people for a really big house in other areas in New York. That’s just an apartment.”

Jessica: 

Yeah. Honestly, that’s huge and I’m thinking about how much we’ve spent on that apartment. It’s crazy. But, like, every single month I don’t have to pay rent ‘cause we live upstate in a house.  And it’s really something that we have that we can put towards savings. 

And every month that’s something that we knew that we were going to have. Leftover now instead of putting towards an apartment.

Debbie:

Let’s fast forward to 50 years from now and you’re looking back at your life. What legacy would you like to leave and what do you want to be remembered for? 

Jessica: 

Oh my God, it’s such a big question. For me, really, it’s all about the community and I’d love to continue building my businesses to something. 

And, really, just be able to reach more people and tell my story and make people feel more comfortable having indulging meals, loving food, and going to all these beautiful destinations and connecting with the people. 

I know we didn’t really get a chance to talk much about travel but it’s something I’m so passionate about because when we go to a destination and eat the cuisine, you’ll just taste the culture. And I think it’s one of the stories that I love to tell the most because when you go there and you see the people in the kitchen and you see their passion, I just feel like there’s a whole world out there.

I hope to inspire people to travel, to eat, to connect, and just have that love over food and meeting people all over the world and seeing what they do and their passion also. 

Debbie:

Well, it’s a great combination that you have: eating and travel. And you were able to make money doing this which is really amazing. And it’s a dream come true for you obviously and for so many people who are looking and listening to your story. 

Jessica:

Yeah, I think travel has been something that we always have loved to do together. Me and Brian have been together for over 12 years and every single year, when I was a high school math teacher, we planned a really big summer trip. And the fact that we were able to do that and go on more trips together. 

Telling that bigger story of the destination just makes me so happy, to be able to share those moments that we have on the other side of the world. Connect with people and share it with another community of people who are just excited to see it. 

Debbie:

Absolutely. And I think the huge thing is that we really look at you for inspiration when we want to travel and experience. And I think you’re right, a huge part of experiencing a culture is through their food and tasting it, right?

Jessica:

It’s so true. I mean, really, we were just in Peru in one of the world’s 50 best restaurants. And we don’t typically go on really expensive dinners,  we usually do more casual stuff, and this experience was so amazing.

The chef came out and he was so casual and we got to see his passion. Just the way the kitchen works and, I don’t know, there’s something about being in that situation and feeling the energy, the love and the passion that comes from the chef in the kitchen. And  I want that to come across to my videos and I hope that it does.

When anyone responds to me like, “Oh my gosh, I went to Peru and I went to that restaurant.” Like it just makes me feel so good. I guess everyone’s gonna roam this summer and we have put out a YouTube channel and  have so many people messaging me about the recommendations I gave and like, “There’s nothing that makes me happier than hearing that.” 

Because we love the experience that we had and being able to share that and knowing that people are going to experience themselves because it’s something they saw on my page – it means everything.

Debbie:

That’s definitely a great way for you to help people: giving them all of these incredible recommendations. And you gain their trust that way, it’s a way for people to really understand before they even go to that country what they really have to taste, do and see.

Jessica:

Exactly. And for me, it’s like people pass on that information to me. I went to all these different restaurants in Rome and I want people to have that experience. So, I’m happy to pass that along to my community.

I think that’s what it’s all about for me: connecting with people. 

Debbie:

It’s amazing that you were able to do this for a living too and get paid for it. 

Jessica:

Yeah. Sure. I know it’s really a blessing. I mean, I’m always like, “People, I tell you, I was a high school math teacher at one time.” It seems like another life that I live in because it really is a dream job. 

I’m so blessed to have an audience to be able to share this with. And work with brands that I love, businesses that I love, and destinations that I love. I think, yeah, it’s a dream job.

Debbie:

Well, also you can tell how grateful you are. And if you guys ever meet Jessica in person, she’s just so down-to-earth and just super friendly. So, she’s definitely who she is, in and outside of social media, the videos, and everything else. 

So, I’m so glad that you actually put yourself out there more and your content because we are able to really connect with you so much more in that way. 

Jessica:

Thank you. A lot of people say with Instagram, obviously, there’s a lot of negative you can take out of it but, at the end of the day, like, connecting with you, Debbie, and people that we have in the past and in the future through an app on your phone is pretty amazing.

Debbie:

Yeah. And it’s funny ’cause Jess and I met each other on a cruise ship actually which was really funny and interesting. That’s why I love this industry because you meet the most interesting people in the most interesting places. 

Jessica:

Yeah. For sure. It’s really true. And I think that one of the things I love is realizing that even if we’re not in the same, let’s say, niche, maybe you’re not doing food, is, like, we realize how much work goes into the content that we create. And I really do admire when I meet these other people and see the work that they do and knowing that we’re in this together.

A lot of people, they might see these photos and, like we’ve mentioned before, the amount of hours I spend editing and putting into this one post is kind of wild but for me, it’s worth it. When I see or meet other creators and I see the passion that they have, it’s infectious – I love it.

Debbie:

We definitely know what it’s like to be in this crazy industry and you’re right, it doesn’t matter if we’re in similar niches or not. It’s still crazy but it’s beautiful crazy. It’s awesome crazy and I think it’s great when you find people in this industry who are also really supportive, who also understand what you’re going through ’cause that support system is key to this.

Jessica:

 I totally agree. 

Debbie:

So what are you working on currently that is really exciting for you?

Jessica:

Well, our 2020 goals are to build our YouTube channel. So, we’ve been putting a lot of time into creating content that’s more long-form where we’re able to tell a bigger story. It’s usually centered around a trip.

We just did one for Peru, we have Idaho and for us, it’s something I’m really excited about just because, obviously, I show up a lot of my Instagram but I think that with YouTube, you’re able to kind of play a different role. 

So, I’ll be like the host of my channel in a sense and I’m taking people around to different restaurants and giving travel tips. So we went to Machu Picchu and we were able to talk about which trail to take. We went to Boise, Idaho, we did the balloon classics, we rode the hot air balloon for the first time.

So, being able to kind of host my own little Cheat Day Eats channel on YouTube is a really big goal of mine. So, I’m really glad that we put a lot of effort into it in 2019 already and that’s something I’m gonna continue to do for 2020.

Debbie:

And let’s not underestimate how much work Jest and her fiance are doing to give you all of that content by the way. And they give such incredible content to you.

Jessica:

Thank you.

Debbie:

And we’re also going to be talking about how to create video content to successfully market your business for the extended interview. So, make sure you tune in for that as well. 

So, Jess,  if our listeners want to know more about you, where can they find you? 

Jessica:

You can find me at @cheatdayeats on all social media channels: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Tiktok, and YouTube.

Debbie:

 Perfect. That’s going to be easy for us. That was great.

Jessica:

Thank you, Debbie.

Debbie:

Thank you so much for being here, Jesse, really appreciate it.

Jessica:

Thanks, guys.

GET THE EXTENDED INTERVIEW WITH JESSICA WHERE SHE SHARES HOW TO USE VIDEO CONTENT CREATION TO SUCCESSFULLY MARKET YOUR BUSINESS.


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Show Credits:

Audio Engineer: Ben Smith


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