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Ep. 212: How these entrepreneurs help creatives build remote businesses with Cat and Renee

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In this week’s episode, I speak with Cat and Renee who are the hosts of The Dreams to Plans podcast. 

A podcast specifically designed for the creative, and small business owner. Building, operating, managing, and running the day-to-day of a creative, small business is a lot of work for a solo entrepreneur to manage. But guess what? You don’t need to do it alone!

Listen on to find out how Cat and Renee have helped others build successful creative online businesses.

Listen Below:

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Transcription:

Debbie:

Hey everyone. Thank you so much for being here. I am really excited for my guests today. I have Renae and Cat. Hey ladies, how are you?

Renee:

Hi, how are you?

Cat:

Hey Debbie, thank you so much for having us. We are super pumped up.

Debbie:

So am I. I love talking to both of you today because your story is really amazing and incredible. Can you take us through that? Can you tell us why you both live an offbeat life?

Cat:

Renee, you want to go first?

Renee:

Well, I’m your girlfriend, Renee, the girlfriend you never thought you needed. You don’t realize you need me in your life until you talk to me and then you’re like, “Where have you been my whole life?”

Cat:

That’s true. I will attest to that that Renee is exactly that person who embodies her entire brand.

Renee:

Yes, a hundred percent. My remote business is helping small business owners. I have The Fresh Perspective online community where I help all small business owners get through the beginning stages by providing tools, knowledge, resource, and support. And that is actually how I met Cat.

Cat:

Yeah. So Cat here. I have a paper goods company where I designed gorgeous and fierce, confident, a little edgy, somewhat inappropriate but always very thoughtful and charming stationery. And I also have this aspect of my remote business where I teach other women who are looking to do exactly what I do and help them not make the same mistakes that I’ve made along the way and help them be successful.

Renee and I connected just randomly on one of my products that she enjoyed and wanted to possibly include in her subscription box. Then we’re like, “Hey, we should start this podcast.” And it took a little bit to kind of get her to say yes.

Renee:

Yeah. I was like, “I hope you’re going to tell ’em I turned you down like a couple of times.”

Cat:

No, you absolutely did.

Renee:

Well, I hunted Cat down. So I crept until I found her. So shout out to Etsy. My original plan was to feature boss babes every single month because my original business was called The Boss Babe Shirt Club. And so I needed boss babes to feature every single month.

When I was launching I’m like, “Well, I don’t even know if I’m going to have enough boss babes.” Like, “I got to go find some boss babes to feature,” ’cause I really didn’t know. Like, when you’re launching a business, you’re like, “Is this really going to work?”

So I didn’t know if I had anybody. So I go to Etsy and I creep and I typed in boss babe gifts. And then Cat shows up. So shout out to Cat for having a good keyword, SEO, can we clap it up? Because she came up and then I messaged her and I was like, “Hey, I really liked your stuff ’cause it was so cute.” It was literally like my brand in stationery. Like it’s so fun. It’s so witty. It’s like just the cutest ever.

And she was like, “Yeah, let’s hop on a FaceTime.” And I was like, “Boom! We are going to be besties for life.” So we did that. And then she asked me to… I don’t remember, did I asked… You asked me to be on your Instagram live, I think, right?

Cat:

Yes, ’cause I was doing a lot of lives just with the pandemic. Sales were kind of slow. I’m like, “I’m going to switch it up here and try something new in my business.” Then I ran out of ideas to go live about though I figured I would start featuring other women and Renee was one of them.

Renee:

Yeah. And I killed it. So I came on…

Cat:

Renee is still humble in case anyone hasn’t noticed.

Renee:

Crushed it. So, my husband, he’s like a good supporter. So he watched the live and after the live, he goes, “That was a really good conversation. You guys should probably do a podcast.” Cat emailed or texted me about a podcast and I’m like, “Nah, too much work. I’m out.”

So we just kind of parked it and then I think my husband kept pushing me. So I messaged her again and I was like, “Alright, I’m in. Let’s do this.” And Cat was overjoyed. She hit the ground running. She was so excited. She was like, “Renee’s going to be in my life. Oh my gosh.”

So long story short, Debbie, we just live an offbeat life, period, with our wacky personalities. And it just kind of overflows into our business.

Debbie:

I love that. And there’s so much excitement in both of your voices. So I can’t even imagine what your audience feels like when they’re listening to both of you.

Cat:

Eye rolling. Still, much eye-rolling.

Debbie:

This is incredible though because it takes a lot of energy to have a partnership with someone, right? How did you both know that you are going to create a really good partnership for yourself and to have this strong connection? Because it’s a tough thing to find the right person.

Cat:

It’s really hard. And I always say, “Man, if I had even just one more of me in my business,” because for the most part, I’m a solo entrepreneur and I have assistants who helped me in different aspects of my team. But if I could just have someone else who thought like me, who had the work ethic like me, who was a special unicorn in their own mind. Like, I kind of feel that I am with my remote business, Kitty Meow, that would be a really great fit.

And I feel like Renee is that person for me. There are things that I excel in that I pick up the slack on as far as The Dreams to Plans podcast. And there are things that she really excels at where she picks up the slack as far as YouTube and Pinterest and all the things that I’m not good at.

And we both are true to our word when we say we’re going to do something, we do it. And that in itself is what you need in a partner – is another hustler. Someone who has that same energy but is different in complimenting ways.

Debbie:

Absolutely. And do you feel the same way, Renee?

Renee:

It’s pretty much like when you meet somebody instantly, you get that vibe, right? So we have never actually met in person. So we’d probably kill each other. Like, we’ve only met online and we FaceTime like 50 times a day and that’s the only real-life connection we’ve ever had.

And so when you meet somebody, even now, I mean, as you know, everybody meets everybody on the internet. That’s like where all our besties are. I mean, Debbie, are you the same? Like, besties on the internet?

Debbie:

Absolutely.

Renee:

Before it would be weird. Like, my mom still thinks it’s weird. She’s like, “You have no friends.” I’m like, “Yes I do. They’re just not here. They’re just all over the country, okay?”

Debbie:

Yeah. They’re probably like, “Are you sure those are not your imaginary friends?”

Renee:

Exactly. Not too far-fetched. So it’s just meeting her online and like we connected so quickly and I knew that everything she was saying, she was like the yin to my yang. So I’m the seller and she’s the builder in the relationship.

Like, I a hundred percent believe this. I’ve heard a podcast saying that every relationship in business or personal has a builder and a seller. So the builder is like the thought leader, the strategist, the planner, the executor. And then you have the seller who is the creative, the visionary, go-getter, the high energy that does all the creative work.

So for me, I play that role because I literally planned nothing. So when we do a podcast, Cat will have a full Google doc with her whole intro, her whole statement, her paragraph. And then it’s like, mine is blank. Like, there’s not one typed word on there.

Cat:

Oh, I do not roll like that at all. That just gives me super anxiety. I can’t live that life.

Debbie:

Well, the great thing about that is you both, as you were saying, complement each other because if you are both similar, you would most likely kill each other. That’s true.

Renee:

We were both like Google dockers and we were just both typing away like, “I’m going to say this at this time and I’m going to say this at this time.” It would not flow like the way we do because it’s just this banter that goes back and forth because it’s a conversation which I think makes a great podcast and a good relationship.

Debbie:

Yeah, absolutely. And then when you both finally connected and you said you haven’t even met in person yet, how did you know that creating this podcast together and also aligning it with your remote business was going to help you grow and connect more with your audience that way?

Renee:

I’m going to say core values because everything goes back to your core values. If you do not know what you stand for and know what you believe in and what your business and brand, what your heartbeat is. When you know those answers, it’s a lot easier to bring people into your life, into your circle, into your remote business.

Because if you stand for the same things which I and Cat do is we prove our core values as a hundred percent provide value always and serve our customers. And if she wasn’t like that, our brand and our business wouldn’t align.

So the fact that our core values are so ingrained in us and we stick by them so much and they both match up, that’s where the good relationship comes from. If our core values didn’t match, it wouldn’t be a good, perfect relationship, I think.

Cat:

Yeah. And at the end of the day, this podcast that we do together, while it’s our thing, it’s still complimentary of our own individual remote businesses. And we use that as another outlet to, one, provide value to our customers in totally different ways and get new customers but then to establish ourselves as authorities in our separate industries.

Debbie:

I’m curious about this because this is really interesting. Usually, when people have podcasts together, it’s because they have a unified business but you both still have a separate entity that you are both trying to build, right? How does that look like for you when doing the podcast and you’re promoting it?

Cat:

Let’s see. Well, my product or my business is very product-based focused. I sell stationery, I do coaching. But for the podcast, we are advertising it in a different way, on a separate Instagram page. But then we very much bring in the opportunity to talk about the areas of our business where we feel we are experts in which are totally different from each other.

I mean, other people were that we’re trying to attract mainly me for my coaching or even I sell to other small businesses, my products because I sell a lot of wholesale that helps them as well as everyone else is trying to build their business too.

And they feel like they just need a friend who’s going to shoot straight with them on the good and the bad and the things you should do and not do.

We never try to paint this picture that, number one, we have all the answers but we are always transparent to the fact that, “Hey, we’re in the trenches here with you. This is hard and we know it’s hard. These are some things that worked for us. This is what didn’t work for us. And hopefully, it can help you in your business journey as well.”

Renee:

And there’s more than one way to skin a cat. Like, what I like about us is that we have completely different perspectives and ways of running our remote businesses. And we have completely different perspectives as far as the way we do things. Like, we are totally opposite.

So you get both perspectives in a podcast episode. I think one of our podcast episodes was like, “Should you buy a course or should you Google it?” And Cat is a total team course person, she just loves it and she’s been through it where I’m like, “I’m a Google, everything. I’m a YouTube everything.”

So it’s like you get to know people on different levels. Sometimes when you’re on Instagram or on social media, you feel like there’s only one way to do things and people are doing it. They have it easier. They do it this way so that must be the only way. And by hearing a couple of different people’s mindsets and way of doing things, it kind of help break down that barrier. It gives you a little bit of confidence, I think.

Debbie:

I love that. I really enjoy the fact that you both are still able to align those values that you have with your audience. And that’s the best way to market yourself too because it’s really who you are and that translates it into your audio, into your podcast.

And also, this is why I love podcasting so much because people really get to know you, they’ll like you, they’ll trust you. And you can get deeper into a subject more so than probably any other platforms and they can intake you anywhere, right?

And you both still haven’t even met each other in person yet and you’re able to build this up and to really create a community from this.

Cat:

Oh yeah. We have a lot of fun and we give each other a hard time and she always is picking on me and I’m taking it like I’m this little sister in the group. But she’s honestly one of my best friends, my best business friends, and that connection with somebody is so important to have whether they are literally in the same room as you or across the country.

You need those people who are going to lift you up in your business because sometimes the people who literally surround you physically just don’t get it. And that’s okay but you need to seek out people who do get it.

Renee:

And push you to be uncomfortable because I think a lot of people don’t push you as far because they don’t want to hurt your feelings or they don’t want to overstep their boundaries. But when you have a friend that is in the business, with that business mindset, they’re going to push you hard whether you like it or not.

Like Cat, I’ve like cursed her name after some of her feedback. And I thank her every day for it but I hate her for it. You know what I mean? I’m like, “Ugh!” But you need somebody to push you and remind you to get out of your comfort zone consistently because it’s so easy to sit back and be comfortable and coast.

Debbie:

Yeah. I agree with that. And also when you are surrounding yourself with this type of community, it’s nothing like you would sometimes most oftentimes with what you have right now. That’s why online and meeting people like this is so crucial and it’s like unicorn friendships, right?

If we didn’t have the internet, I don’t know if we would have all met each other, even spoken to each other. So thank goodness for that.

Cat:

Exactly.

Debbie:

So let’s go back to both of your journeys when you first started your remote businesses, right? Some people don’t stick with their day job or leave their day job, or even go into a day job for so many different things, right? Whether it’s they want more freedom to travel, whether it’s to spend time with their family, whether it’s to really just do whatever they want, right?

A lot of us it’s all about freedom. What about the both of you? What does that look like to you? How did it go from going into this remote entrepreneurship for the both of you?

Cat:

Well, for me, I always knew that I wanted to be a graphic designer. I always knew that I had a passion for designing beautiful things. When I graduated from college, I moved from the Chicago-land area to Las Vegas and worked at some pretty cool places, doing nightlife, advertising, and quickly found that I just hated my life and was surrounded by people who were just bringing bad things to my life.

And I don’t put that on anyone else. Those are absolutely my choices but I was just unhappy every day. I remember being in an office where people didn’t really talk to each other and I didn’t want to pass my boss’s office to go to the bathroom. So I would try not to go to the bathroom all day long. I’m like, “Is this really my life? Is this what I’m choosing to do?

And I just worked really hard to get to the point where I could leave and run my own business. And I have to be honest, now I work way more than I probably ever imagined I would but I am so excited to get out of bed in the morning and work on things that bring me joy that I feel are making a difference in this world. And that is valuable to me.

It’s like my dream that I’m building, not somebody else’s. And for me, that’s totally invaluable. Even though I’m working way more hours, it’s a lot more enjoyable way to spend my life.

Renee:

And I just hate working for people. Mine was easy.

In high school, I grew up with a single mom. So she worked the normal corporate nine to five, Monday through Friday. I was in daycare after school and I’m like, “Is this what I have to do?” Like, where you don’t have time off, you have to wait for vacation. You get like three sick days or whatever. And I knew in high school, I’m like, “I’m not going to live that life.” That literally helped me.

So I went to school to be a cosmetologist, did hair for a couple of years, spray tanning. I’m a people person, love doing that. So that was where I started to realize, like, I’ve always worked for myself. I never did the whole nine to five route ’cause I, like I said, don’t like people telling me what to do.

And eventually started the online thing when I became a stay-at-home mom. And it was like, I don’t know any different. Like, I don’t know how to work in corporate. I don’t know how to have a boss. I don’t know how to do any of that. So this is my wheelhouse and I don’t know any different. So it’s just effortless for me.

Debbie:

It’s kind of interesting, right? When you are in your day job and you’re looking around, I don’t know if either one of you, this has happened to you but it’s definitely happened to me. I looked around at my supervisors, the people that were above me and I didn’t want any of their lives.

And I was like, “What am I doing? Why am I here? If I don’t want that, then there’s no reason for me to be here. I need to change things up because this is not the life I want for myself.”

So it’s so funny that you’re both in that mindset too. And I think pretty much a hundred percent of the people that I have interviewed have said a lot of similar things. It just wasn’t for you. You knew it wasn’t for you. It didn’t give you life. There’s a lot of people that are happy with that and there’s nothing wrong with it.

But for those of us who have been there or just known from the beginning that it just wasn’t the life we wanted to live. So there are definite alternatives to it. And you both have shown how it can work.

Cat:

Yeah. The person on top is totally miserable. Why do you want to be like that personally? what are you aspiring towards?

Debbie:

Absolutely. And if you even think about it like that, then it becomes so much clearer that you need to do something else for yourself.

Cat:

Well, it goes with everything too. I say this with criticism, if I heard it as a quote or something but if somebody is giving you criticism or advice and you wouldn’t trade lives with them, then why are you listening? Same with lifestyle. Like, if you have a boss that’s supposedly what you want to be and you don’t even want their lifestyle, Why would you ever do that?

Debbie:

It’s kind of amazing. I know, I’m still amazed sometimes with how long sometimes it takes for us to actually figure that out because we’re so used to being told to just suck it up and stay there because this is how life should be, right?

And it takes you a really long time to get out of that mindset and say to yourself, “No, I shouldn’t be freaking miserable every day. I should be doing something that I actually enjoy. I should be waking up excited about what I’m doing. And even if I’m working a lot, it’s because I chose to do that not because I’m forced to, or I have to but because I literally get up every single day. And that’s the first thing that I think about and I’m excited to do it.”

Cat:

Same. A hundred percent agree.

Renee:

Totally agree. No pension plan, no 401k, none of that garbage that is so important to my parents that they tried to sell me on. Is that important to me to work at a job that I just freaking hate? Like, “Ugh…” I feel sorry for people who feel like they have to make that choice in their life but you have to know that there’s a better way. You just gotta find it for yourself.

Debbie:

Yeah. Well, we’re here. So I’m glad that you guys are able to talk about this and hopefully I’m sure you’re going to help somebody out.

Alright. So ladies, for each of your remote businesses, how did you land your first client?

Cat:

Should I go first, Renee? Or do you want to go for it?

Renee:

Go for it.

Cat:

I tell this story all the time ’cause I’m so lame but it’s part of my brand story. So I had an Etsy shop and my stationery company is called Kittie Meow Boutique. There are no cats, I’m more of a dog person but it’s just this goofy nickname that I have for myself and this juxtaposition of fancy mixed with fun.

But I had one baby shower invite in my Etsy shop and I had a customer who is now, almost 10 years later, It was still one of my best customers who bought this design and then referred me to all of her friends and family who loved to spend oodles and oodles of money on paper goods and custom designs, whether it’s for their holiday cards or for weddings, baby showers, birthday parties, all of the things.

And I don’t even really do that much custom work anymore. My business is primarily wholesale but just having that one customer who believed in me made me feel like, “Okay, I’m worthy of this. I can get more customers. I can do more designs. I can do more things.” And it just was a snowball effect from there.

And my business is in a place that I never would have even imagined possible just a couple of years ago. And I’m super grateful for that one client. They always say the power of one, you don’t always need a million, you just need that one to really get the ball rolling in your business.

Renee:

And mine kind of evolved. I started with a boutique, an online boutique, and that kind of was closed and everything. And my one customer, I guess there are couples, many, whatever you want to say kept telling me what they wanted.

So they actually pushed me because I had one shirt that said Babes Support Babes on it. And it kept selling out. And I was like, “Well, why aren’t you guys buying my dresses? My dresses are cute. This is cute.” And everybody’s like, “Nah, girl. We don’t want your dresses. We just want this shirt.”

So that shirt kept selling out and I realized, listening to them, that was who my customer was. It was all women’s supporting women, small business owners, MLM, like, the whole shebang. And that’s what pushed me into designing my own shirts because I kept selling out of that one. And my market told me what they wanted for me. And it was good.

It was a really cool lesson in listening to your audience instead of trying to sell something that you want to sell.

Debbie:

Ah, girl, preach. I have been a victim of that for a really long time. And when I finally figured that out, then everything changed.

Renee:

Yeah, you have to listen. I always tell people, even small business owners. Like, in my community, they’ll say, “I’m thinking of doing this.” And I’m like, “Well, did you do any market research? Did you ask your following?” Because we tend to want to sell things that we think people want. And if you don’t listen to people telling you what they want, then you’re going to fall flat on your face.

And that’s okay. You’re going to learn. It cost me a lot of money to learn that lesson so I’m playing this for free because I had a lot of inventory sitting in of all these cute dresses that nobody wanted. So if you listen to your audience, they’re going to tell you what they want but you have to be open enough and egoless to listen. If that makes sense.

Debbie:

That makes a lot of sense, actually. You’re speaking to me.

Renee:

I told you I’m the girlfriend you never thought you needed.

Cat:

Oh, God. Renee…

Debbie:

For me, for example, I have programs right now that I literally created after I got clients and it was because of market research. I actually went out and asked what they wanted and then they were like, “I’ll pay you for it.” And I’m like, “Great. I haven’t even made it but here you go.”

And before, like you were saying, I was creating stuff, products, nobody even wanted. And I was like, “Why is there no one wanting this?” And that was exactly it. It’s because you didn’t actually ask them what they wanted. So yes, a huge lesson, cost me lots of money too. I’m with you.

Renee:

The market will tell you what they want. They will tell you and it ain’t going to be cheap.

Debbie:

Yeah. So hopefully you hear this first before you go out there and start doing stuff that nobody wants, right?

Renee:

Exactly.

Debbie:

Alright, ladies. So let’s fast forward to 30 to 40 years from now and you’re both looking back at your life, what legacy would you like to leave and what do you both want to be remembered for?

Cat:

Ooh, that’s a heavy one. I want to be remembered for being totally fabulous, fun, but at the same time, really kind and willing to share everything that I know because in the paper goods, stationery industry, there’s a lot of competition.

I mean, realistically, in every industry, there’s a lot of freaking competition but there’s more than enough room at the table for everyone to sit and be successful. And I truly believe that. I’ve worked with coaches who say that but they don’t really believe it. And all it does is create this sort of ugliness in an industry that should be so lighthearted and beautiful.

And I don’t want anyone who works with me to feel that I’m coaching them in a way that is one-sided or selfish. Like, I want to see people succeed. And as a creative community, just in general, if the person next to me succeeds, we all succeed and we’re all better together.

And I want to be known for being that type of true and honest, just putting it all out there, vulnerable all of the things type of person.

Renee:

I’m going to probably have a monument in my front yard of me with a fountain coming out of it. I’m definitely the queen of having my own merchandise with my face on it that nobody asks for.

Cat:

How do I market research and not doing the market research? No one wants it, Renee.

Renee:

My fan club wants it even though not one of them asks for it, it’s fine. But I just want to be known to be the girlfriend. Like, the resource, the go-to girlfriend that got you out of your own way because if anybody can teach you that, it’s me.

I dimmed my light for so long. And I thought I wasn’t good enough for so long. And I let other people shine brighter than me because I thought they had something I didn’t.

And I think we all feel that way. And I want to be the person that goes first and breaks down the barriers, gets wounded, gets hurt, gets freaking hit in the gut, and I’ll report back and say, “Don’t do this.” You know what I mean?

And just be real with you and tell you you have what it takes. You just have to get out of your own way. And obviously, my hair is a good one too and my makeup. I do really good eyeliner. So I would like to be known for everything and all the things.

Renee:

Not as woo-woo as Cat.

Cat:

Oh my God.

Debbie:

You’re like, “I want a statue of me. And that’s my legacy.”

Renee:

Exactly. Once you see the pose you’ll be like, “That’s my girlfriend, Renee. Respect!”

Cat:

Debbie, you’re laughing but this woman is serious.

Debbie:

I’m sure. And I will go visit it if I’m still here.

Renee:

It’s going to be tacky and leopard and it’s going to have glitter and lights and a shrine. It’s fine. It’s the way it is. You have to toot your own horn. I’m telling you, friends. Like, nobody’s going to toot your own horn. You got to do it yourself. Because if you don’t think you’re amazing, nobody else is gonna think you’re amazing.

Cat:

That is true.

Debbie:

I second that, yes. So you should actually create this before 40 or 30 years from now. Should be sooner rather than later so we could still be here to see it.

Renee:

I’m going to get trophies made. I’m just going to get trophies ’cause I have like a golden trophy. It says most extra but I’m going to get one of me. And then I’m going to hand those out to people when they get out of their own way.

I’m going to be like, “Welcome. You cross the barrier you are now I have your own way.” That’s what it’s going to be.

Debbie:

That’s going to be so much fun. I love that.

Renee:

And zero market research. Actually, you guys are my market research and you’ve proven. That’s two people that said it was a good idea so that means I’m gonna sell it.

Debbie:

There you go. That’s market research she’s doing right now. If you’re agreeing to what Renee is saying, then sent her a message after you listened to this show and tell her you would like that as well.

Renee:

Yeah. That’s what it’s going to say.

Debbie:

Oh my God. You guys are so funny.

Alright. So lastly, I have five questions for both of you and you have to answer them in one sentence. Are you both ready?

Renee:

Yes.

Cat:

Oh my gosh, yes.

Debbie:

Okay. First question: what’s the worst food you’ve ever eaten and why?

Renee:

I’m a five-year-old, I like chicken nuggets.

Debbie:

What’s the worst? Worst.

Renee:

I don’t have anything else?

Debbie:

That’s the only thing she likes.

Cat:

Oh my gosh. I’m not prepared for these questions. Oh geez, worst food. I don’t like poke.

Debbie:

Oh, is that stick thing with the chocolate or whatever on the end of it? Is that it?

Cat:

Nope.

Renee:

I don’t know what it is.

Debbie:

Is that Japanese food? It’s like a salad with sushi in it. Is that what you’re talking about?

Cat:

It’s like a Hawaiian…

Debbie:

Oh yes. Okay. Oh my God. I love that.

Cat:

Like I love sushi. I just…

Debbie:

But you don’t like poke. Okay.

Cat:

Sorry.

Debbie:

They have like the best poke in Las Vegas for some reason. I guess because there’s a lot of Hawaiian people there. So maybe go to Hawaii or to Las Vegas to get it. I don’t know where you are right now but that’s my suggestion.

Cat:

I did have it in Hawaii. That’s where I had it.

Debbie:

You didn’t like it? No…

Cat:

And I love all types of food. I’m not Renee. I’m not like a chicken nugget kind of a dork.

Debbie:

I love her answer. It’s like, “I only like chicken nuggets. Everything else is the worst food I’ve ever eaten.”

Alright. So, describe what your ideal day would look like.

Cat:

Ooh, in the desert, 80 degrees with my boys. Am I wrong for saying I want to like work on my business all day? It makes me a horrible mom.

Renee:

Of course, you would say that, Cat. Of course.

Debbie:

Hey, that’s your ideal day or we’re not going to say anything. That’s what you like to do.

Renee:

I’m gonna take on ultra cooler, iced down beers.

Cat:

You threw me under the bus on that one.

Debbie:

If you could have one superpower, what would it be?

Renee:

Be invisible.

Cat:

Ooh. Kind of like magically snap my fingers and I’m like all ready for the day.

Debbie:

I’d be like a filter, right? Or like just a button that you push.

Cat:

I want to have a filter on me, like, just magically. That’s amazing. Debbie, please invent that.

Renee:

Don’t mean to be any more opposite. I want invisible superpowers. I’m thinking of all the Avengers superpowers right now.

Debbie:

You’ll like, “Yes, I’m going to be invisible so…”

Renee:

I have laser eyeballs.

Debbie:

I love that. Alright. What’s the one thing that you wish you did sooner?

Renee:

Oh, went for it. Go. Now. Like, go everything. Yes. Say yes to everything.

Cat:

Yeah. I wish I would have stopped being afraid of what other people thought of me a lot quicker because it just holds you back and it’s pointless.

Debbie:

Yeah. I feel like we have done that, especially when you’re younger you care more about what other people say. And I think once I hit 30, I just didn’t give a…

Cat:

I was going to say that, once you hit 30 it’s like everybody can…

Renee:

Fuck off.

Cat:

Exactly.

Renee:

Shhh.

Debbie:

It’s true. Once I hit 30, I was like, “I don’t care.” I’m like, “I’m not going to wear heels anymore. I’m not going to wear makeup.” Like, “I don’t care.” But yeah. I love that.

Well, thank you so much ladies for being here, you’re both so much fun to talk to and your podcast is incredible because you’re both amazing. If our listeners want to know more about you, where can they find you?

Renee:

Oh, am I going Cat? Thanks, friend. @dreamstoplanspodcast on Instagram and our website is DreamsToPlansPodcast.com. And I’m @mygirlfriendrenee on everything and Cat is @kittymeowboutique on Instagram.

Debbie:

Perfect.

Cat:

Thank you, Debbie. You are just so fun and yeah, we’ve had a lot of fun.

Debbie:

Awesome. Thanks, ladies. We can’t wait to listen to your podcast as well.

Renee:

Thank. you.

Cat:

Thank you.

GET THE EXTENDED INTERVIEW WITH CAT AND RENEE WHERE THEY SHARE HOW TO STAY TRUE TO YOUR BUSINESS MISSION & BRAND.


Show Credits:

Audio Engineer: Ben Smith


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