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Ep. 269: How This Former Chef Became A Remote Serial Entrepreneur with Jaiden Vu

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In this episode, I speak with Jaiden who became a serial entrepreneur in order to gain more freedom. 

Jaiden knew that he wanted to become successful, but wasn’t sure how to go about it. His initial spark came from his personal goal to be the first millionaire in his family. 

While some people get their drive from a source of inspiration, Jaiden was mainly driven by his desperation for a more fulfilling life where money was not a concern at all.

When Jaiden is not working, you can find him researching his next watch investment and reading 85 books a year.

 


Listen below:

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Transcription:

Debbie:

Hey everyone, thank you so much for being here. I am really excited to speak with my guests today. I’m here with Jaiden. Hey Jaiden. How are you?

Jaiden:

I’m fantastic. Thanks for having me there, Debbie.

Debbie:

Thank you so much for being here. Can you tell us about you Jaden and why you live an offbeat life?

Jaiden:

Yeah, so you know, just a little bit about me. I’m a sir entrepreneur I’m in the drop shipping eCommerce space. And the reason why I live in offbeat life is because I like to go against the norm. I like to do things that people don’t think are traditional. So I was raised in a household where the norm was to be a doctor or a lawyer or accountant or something like that. I decided, know what I’m going to go run my own business, no matter how many times I fail. So, you know, it treated me well and I’m, I’m happy where I am.

Debbie:

I know it’s pretty interesting when you go off to a different trajectory than what most people in your family goes to. And in the beginning it’s like, oh my gosh, are you crazy? And then once you start succeeding, they’re like, how did you do it? So, how did you get to that point where you wanted to be an entrepreneur, especially maybe your family weren’t like that. How did you take that risk to do something different?

Jaiden:

Yeah. Great question. So I’m what, like, some people can relate to is called an accidental entrepreneur where it was not something I was on my mind. Like I didn’t grow up or, you know, wake up one day as like today is the day I’ve become an entrepreneur, start a business. I mean, at the time that word didn’t even exist. Right. I didn’t even know what that meant. The reason why I got into just building my own business was because I was just getting into a position where I feel like a, I’m not making enough money, cuz there’s always a ceiling or a cap of what I’m doing. You a traditional occupation. And then two is, I just wanted more freedom. Like for me now the biggest thing is not so much about the financial rewards. It’s about kinda like the time freedom. And back then when I was working because I used to be a chef.

So I was a corporate chef turned to see entrepreneur and like, whenever I wanted to have a day off or a week off or it’s just travel, you know, most people they have to do. What’s called scheduling their day off. You know, you have to get approved by management in order to have time or spend time with your family or friends. And I didn’t feel like that was living life. That’s kind of like, you know, you’re running on this treadmill hoping to just keep up before you kind of like burn out. So I was just like, is life kind of like this? Or is there more out there? Can I be my own boss? And when I saw other people that were just living their life, making money through their phone and their laptop and they didn’t have to schedule day off it’s because they own the business. I was just like, I wanna taste of that.

Debbie:

Yeah. And I love that you mentioned having freedom because for most of us who have started this type of lifestyle, it is all about the freedom. And I think you really realize how important your time is and how you spend it once you actually get there. Because for the most part for us, when we start this, it is a lot of work. It’s a lot of hustling and you actually end up working more than your day job. And then even though you don’t ask a boss, when you can take the time off, you are your own boss. And most of the time, we’re like, no, I’m not gonna take this time off because I have X, Y, and Z to do. But then when you get to a point where you maybe delegate, you have a team and then you can take that time and then you realize, oh my gosh, what have I been missing my entire life? So it’s, it’s so crazy how time passes, you work all that, and then you finally reach it. So when you finally reach that pivotal moment, when you did have that freedom, Jaiden, how did it feel?

Jaiden:

I’m thinking I’m not pausing. I’m thinking. Cause it was, it was it was breathtaking, right? I, I knew, I mean the first thing or at least for me, I think it’s kinda like a norm when you, you want something so bad and you crave for it, like you chase after it. There’s always like, whenever you try to go for something, there’s always like these moments or obstacles, like get thrown at you and you feel like you are getting further away as opposed to closer to it. Yeah. so for me, I, I cried, right? I was jumping up in joy, you know tears of joy and stuff like that. But the, the feeling that I really remember that I’ll never forget. It’s just kind of that sigh relief, you know, that all this struggle, all this work and all this, all this self doubt and all this I would say a little bit depression, cuz sometimes being an entrepreneur, it’s not all fun.

It’s not glamorous and stuff like that. You do go through some emotional struggles, but it’s kind of like just that sigh relief is like, okay, it paid off. I wasn’t crazy. I didn’t I didn’t cave into what my parents or my friends were saying. Cuz most people, they, if they’ve never done it themselves, they will never be able to support you in the way that you want them to. Because they don’t know what it’s like to be an entrepreneur. They don’t know why you’re taking all these risks. So as opposed to go, like yeah, you know, we believe in you, you can do it. It’s and then versus like, why are you doing this? You’re crazy. Why don’t we just stick to your biweekly paycheck that can, you can pay the rent with like, why are you willing to jump into the unknown and hoping there’s a net on the very bottom that catches you if you don’t fly. So it’s just a sigh relief to go like, you know what? This is actually legit. Like, you know, there is hope for people that want to go and branch out and do their own thing and not have to live the norm anymore and live a better offbeat life. You know?

Debbie:

Yeah. It’s your way of finally, not even like you’re mentioning, you know, it’s not just for everybody’s else it’s for yourself because you do, you work so hard to get to that point. And there are a lot of risks that you take. There are a lot of mistakes, there’s a lot of failures. There’s a lot of self-doubt that goes along with it. And you’re also right. Not many people unless they’ve gone through something similar to, you will understand how it really feels. Once you finally start getting what your goals are. And then most of the time it’s up and down, it’s really great. And then the next, you know, few months it’s really bad. And then the next year it’s amazing. And then the next it’s like it’s a roller coaster for, for the most part. So finally having that is a huge accomplishment 

Jaiden:

Yes, exactly. Rollercoaster is the best way to sum it up.

Debbie:

So how did you get, let’s go back to when you first started this and you were a corporate chef. So how does a corporate chef become a serial and accidental entrepreneur? Because you know, we, we wanna learn how to do that. How do you, how do you take that leap and how did you make that successful?

Jaiden:

Yeah, this is a very fond memory. So taking a trip down memory lane and I, I used to be shy talking about it, but now I love talking about it cuz it inspires people. So how does one individual aspire to be the next go Ramsey and open us up his own restaurant, be, you know, decide to become a sea entrepreneur and give that all up. So I was actually trained you know, friends and Italian cooking. So my goal was to be, you know, opening up my own restaurant and what gave me the drive and motivation after spending years and years being classically trained is really just financial, you know, money. I thought going into the industry, everything was glamorous that, you know, once you’ve learned from the best European chefs and you pay your dues, that at some point you will make good money.

Cuz at the time I was barely making minimum wage, right? You’re working 10 hours on your feet. They pay you, what’s called a daily wage and that’s all you make, no more, no less. And at that time, while you’re learning for the experiences, because you’re really training time for experiences, right? Cause if you have the opportunity to work under a two Michelin or three Michelin star chef and for any of your audience that understand the lingo Michelin, it’s just how they rate specific restaurants in terms of how well they do. Right? So for me it was just like looking at my paycheck every single day and trying to play almost like Jenga, trying to mix a match of how I’m going to pay rent, how I’m gonna buy food. It gets really tough. So living paycheck to paycheck while kind of being under an impression that I’m training my time for experiences, but my bills keep getting higher and higher.

It got to you? It did get to me. And I was chasing the money. I really wanted to be able to chase the money, follow the money and, and really believe that there’s better out there. So that gave me that kick and what really gave me the ultimate like jump or kind of like that kick was I saw an individual that I knew that was an indu restaurant industry as well. And he left and jumped ship and all of a sudden over his social media post, you know, you get the nice car, the nice suits and stuff like that. And I was wondering what he’s doing differently. Like is, is he selling like drugs? Or like what, what is this guy doing? Right. Because he left the culinary industry, a hospitality industry together. So fast forward you know, long story short, I asked him, you know, can we meet for a coffee?

Can I buy you a coffee? Cuz that’s all I can afford at the time. Like I couldn’t buy people lunch. Right. So that’s kinda like the other motivator. I could never really afford a proper lunch. Coffee’s what I can do. So I asked him for coffee and we sat down and I don’t know if you’ve ever watched a movie there. Debbie Wolf of wall street. Yeah. Yeah, you did. Okay. Good. Good. Okay. Awesome. I love having this comparison cuz it’s exactly the same. So there was a scene of Leonard DiCaprio and Jonah Hill sitting in the coffee shop, Leonardo DiCaprio’s in his suit in his briefcase getting his coffee, right. Then you have Jonah hill walks over, looking all nerdy and raspy and he’s like, is that your car? And he’s like, yeah, it’s like, it doesn’t make any sense. You live in the same building as me, but you drive a nice yellow Jaguar.

Like I can’t put it together. And then, you know, the scene unfolds. He quits his job and decides to go work with Leonardo DiCaprio cuz he showed the pay stub for how much he made. That’s what happened to me? We sat down for coffee, and the guy showed me the pay stub. This is how much you made. He showed it for $65,000. And I was like, is that what you make in a year? He’s like, no, I make this in two weeks. And at that time I couldn’t comprehend $65,000 2 weeks because I made 35,000 in a year before tax. It’s a long story short. I just called my chef, my, the owners, I hung up my knives and you know, threw in the napkins and towels. I was like, I don’t wanna work here anymore. And then I got into the insurance sales business.

Debbie:

That is incredible. And when you looked at that paycheck and you were like, oh my gosh, were you even thinking about, was it something that you would enjoy doing or was it mostly financial? And it was kind of like the sticker shock of the, the, the pace of that you were like, oh my gosh, this is what I need to be. And this is where my life has to go through.

Jaiden:

Exactly. It’s latter. Right? It was money talks. It was purely financially driven, motivated. And I had, I didn’t know what to sell. I mean, it was a young 20 ish year old that just came from the kitchen and I was just like, I don’t care what he’s doing. If he’s moving this, moving that, you know, shoveling dirt for $65,000 in two weeks, I will do that. Just gimme the money. And that’s, you know, just kinda like Jerry McGuire said, show me the money.

Debbie:

I do also want to talk about, because we, we see this a lot, right? People say, follow your passion and the money will come. And in your experience and in my experience as well, following your passions, most of the time, if you are not thinking about financials, either it doesn’t come. Especially if you don’t know how to make that into a reality, because I’ve been through what you’ve gone through, where I followed my passion, but I didn’t focus on the money. And obviously, because I didn’t money didn’t come. And you did the same thing. You know, you were a really great chef. You were working under people who were the top of the business and you kept working and working and you weren’t able to make a living. And there is a huge misconception with that, that I think people just think, okay, I could just do, I could just free be free and do what I love. And then all of this will come. And then you realize, you know, I mean, there’s obviously exceptions to the rule and things happen, but for the most part, it doesn’t, unless you’re able to connect both of them. So, how did you get to the point where now you are also, I mean, are you passionate about what you do Jaiden or is it that you followed the money, the money allowed you to have the freedom and now you’re able to do what you’re passionate about. So how did that go with you?

Jaiden:

Yeah. And Debbie, and it’s a great thing that you brought up and I kind of wanna piggyback off, and I almost kinda like to amplify what you said there before I answer your question, I might ask, have to ask you to repeat if I forget. Yeah, but following your passion, doesn’t really equate to, you know, making an abundance of money and I’m not saying the universal saying is wrong. It’s just kinda like, it depends on the context. It depends on the situation, right? So most people who chase their passion, if Financial’s not a thing yeah. They can keep building on forever. And at some point they will, they will make it right. And then for people who are struggling, trying to follow the passion, it’s not gonna work out. I equate like following your passion, as opposed to the money is kinda like being a starving artist, right?

Debbie:

Yes.

Jaiden:

Like you are probably artistically gifted. At some point you can be the next Denzel Washington or the next Leonardo DiCaprio or, you know Martha Stewart or whatever the case may be. But how long can you put all that work and see no returns? Like, are you financially stable to go through all of that? So for me, you know, passionately driven as opposed to financially driven, you can flip that around. So for me, I chased the money and then I built a passion out of what was making me rich. What was, you know, paying the bills. So did I love sales when I started? No, I hated it. Being front of people, trying to offer them some type of program, sometime some type of product. I hated it. After a few years when my bank account grew, I loved it. Now I love sales forever.

I do everything sales, right? So you can get passion out of something that you are driven financially. And, and it happens all the time, right? No one wakes up. They’re like, I wanna be a salesperson. I want to be an eCommerce. I want to build my own business, but you end up loving it because it starts to pay. The bills gives you more freedom. It allows you to buy your first property, allows you to take those vacations. You don’t have to save up six months for, and allows you to buy things for your family that you just want to feel good about yourself to be able to do that. So I just wanna kinda amplify that for your audience there, Debbie. So not to get off track there.

Debbie:

Yeah. And, and you know what it is too. It’s like, we, we all want to do something that we love. That’s really obvious, right? Because you don’t wanna do something that you hate for the rest of your life. And I think that’s what most of us millennials, gen Z are trying to work towards because we don’t have to live like what our parents had to go through. Our grandparents had to go through, but we also need to be realistic. And I tell people all the time, there’s a vacation lifestyle. And then there’s a freedom lifestyle. A vacational lifestyle is very unsustainable. You’re probably going through your savings. If you’re lucky enough to have family that have money, which I’m sure you don’t. And I don’t, you know, it’s unsustainable for you to be able to do that. But when you have a freedom lifestyle, you create that freedom for yourself, whether it’s creating something that you were passionate about and you made money on it, or you did make money and then you started loving it.

And then you created that for yourself. So you also have to be very realistic about this. And this is why I love talking to people like you, Jaden, because we kind of have to take that, you know, rose colored glasses, as they say with this type of thing that we can’t always love what we do. We have to do certain things as an adult that will allow us to feed ourselves, feed our family, and then do something that we love later on too. Or it could be a, a combination of both. So I, I love that you were talking about this because I don’t think this is talked about enough. And I think when people hear this, it’s like, it’s very conservative. It’s very old school, but I’m like, but it’s realistic though. It’s realistic. It has to be talked about.

Yeah. And I love that. I just wanted to kind of quickly cuz everything you’re saying, I would wanna wrap up in, you know, just kind of like this segment about passion and really kind of like the vacation lifestyle and time freedom lifestyle is what my mentor said to me at a very young age. And I have a lot of mentors around me. And what you kind of just summarize is what he said is like in order to get the things you love, you have to be able to do the things you hate. Yeah. Right. Because we don’t love everything we do. But all those things that we don’t love to do, it gets us closer to what it is that we do love. Right. So whether it’s putting in more hours, whether it’s wearing hat like many hats all at once, being able to go through those tough moments, those are things you hate to do, but gives you the things that you end up loving to do. Yeah.

And it’s unfortunate cuz I think most people just wanna get to the part where it’s good and and skip. I mean, we all want that. I wish we could all just skip to, you know, they have like all the tos and the Instagram, like let’s skip to the good part. I’m like I wish every time I wish we could just skip to the good part.

Jaiden:

Let’s skip to the good part.

Debbie:

Exactly. So you ended up now as a serial entrepreneur, one of the things that you are doing are eCommerce. You have eCommerce businesses. How did you get from, you know, insurance sales to now you have an eCommerce business and you’re making income from this and it allowed you to have more freedom that you’ve never had before. How did that even happen? How did you get introduced to that? And how did you make that work for you?

Jaiden:

Yeah. Great question. So, you know, long before this became like really, really popular, which is around the time the pandemic, right? When really people started, you know, getting furloughed or laid off and they’re looking eCommerce just like, it would be nice to open up a store and sell some products to people. Right? Like before that time for me, it was kind of like I just love do new things. The one thing that is my double edge sword about myself, which is strength or weakness, is that I love to do things from scratch. See it do very well and then kind of just slowly give up on it. So with the few, you know, with the multiple businesses I ran, I would always be the very beginning, started, get it to a certain like financial milestone and then I would lose love and just go hire a CEO to take it over for me.

So, you know, I couldn’t really stick with the same business and trying to grow it to a higher level. So that kind of habit led me to eCommerce. So eCommerce was not my first business, right. It, it eCommerce is my seventh business and it was literally like a napkin conversation. I was having lunch with a few colleagues and they were talking and at some point we brought up eCommerce and drop shipping and I was like, what is eCommerce? Like having a store and selling products. And we kind of dove into that conversation a little bit more. And then they were just like, you should try it. And for me, like at that point, taking risk was not so huge, right. At least from a financial perspective cause I was already comfortable. So I decided to get into it, lost a lot of money. I would say, I didn’t know what I was doing.

And at that time I was like, yeah, I don’t know if I should get a mentor. I feel like I have all the financial resources to kind of figure this out myself and I was completely wrong so I you know, I played around and then invest into a mentor and then drop shipping, came around the time and I was really against job shipping, which is I’m doing now. And going back to what we were saying earlier, you do the things you hate in order to find it things you love. Right. So I hated job shipping the sound of it, where you are not building a business you’re you don’t have a mission. I’m all about building a brand and really having a statement behind why you’re building a brand drop shipping was the total opposite. You’re selling faceless products for, for capital gains.

Right? and then it kind of grew on me. And then I got, I realized that you can use this model to turn into a brand because drop shipping is basically just being able to verify the demand of a product. And I enjoyed it. I loved it. And it literally, I just gave it my all and I’m been doing it for a while and I actually really enjoy it. And then when the pandemic came, I was just like, oh my God, I love it even more. Right. So yeah, that’s how I kind of got into it. Just another accident, I would say.

Debbie:

Yeah, that would, well, it is a happy accident and it was at the right time. I feel like, because now you have something that has longevity and a lot of people would love to get into and it’s becoming more and more popular, which is, you know, you’re like, yay. Sometimes things just work out, you know, and they happen for a reason. You’re like, yay for all of this. So you’ve mentioned Jaiden that you’ve had seven businesses.

Can you tell us all seven of them because that’s pretty wild and awesome.

Jaiden:

Yeah, of course. I’ll be happy to. So the first business I start, okay, well I started three businesses that completely flopped and I lost like 300 grand. Oh great. And that’s a lot of money, but it was just fortunate cuz I did very well in my sales job. So the fourth business, it took off and I was a social media agency. So we’re really just basically helping influencers become influencers. So that’s what we’re doing. The second one was a real estate wholesaling company that we started where we’re basically just taking up homes or that, or like, you know, we call it TLC. So homes that need some tender love and care and they will fix it up and then flip it. Third business was a PR agency where we help people really be able to kind of get into the PR world of things. The fourth business was a tech company. So it was a tech play, the fifth business focused on really just more so going back to my roots and catering and stuff like that, cuz I’ve always like I still have a love and stuff for catering and cooking. So I figured I would start a catering company, but that didn’t do well. So and then seven business led me to drop shipping.

Debbie:

Wow. And it’s so interesting how different they are from each other. And you just tried your way into different aspects of different businesses and you know, there were flops and then there were the ones that did succeed. So it also just goes to show us all that a successful business person doesn’t succeed. Usually their first try. You have to keep trying over and over and over again. And there’s a lot of failures and mistakes and financial losses that you had mentioned, which is a lot of money as well as financial gains. And you, you reap what you sell. Right? You there’s a lot of things that you had gone through and learned from this. So that’s pretty incredible that you had gone through all of that and you didn’t give up, yeah.

Jaiden:

And, and honestly giving up doesn’t exist in a vocabulary. So that’s like the that’s a other trait that I’m very proud of. And a lot of people do have it. Some people don’t and the ones that do they do very well in life, right. Is my inherent ability to just never give up no matter how tough it is. Right. So getting a little bit more person personable here is the reason why I picked that up was because I did suffer from depression, right? Like a lot of us go through some kind of mental anxiety, some kind of mental roadblock or some kind of mental, you know, setback or some kind of emotional struggle for me. I suffer from depression for seven years and you know, I overcame it. And what I learned from that whole seven year experience is that I’m one tough individual that no matter what gets thrown at me, I’ll figure a way out.

And if anyone’s ever gone through depression and if you’re listening today here as an audience, if you, if you are going through it or you’ve went through it, you, you know that you’re gonna come alive because you have hope. I mean, that’s all we cling onto is hope. Right? So when it came out of it, for me, it was life became easier because you realize there was nothing worse that you can go through than this. And that’s why I went from business to businesses cuz it’s the same trait that allowed me to overcome depression that I’ve inherently built and going like, yeah, you know what? Life can throw me 15 different curve balls, but I promise you I’ll Dodge them. I’ll still get hit, but I’ll Dodge them and move forward because no matter how heavy, how hard I get hit, I’ll just keep moving because I’m, I have hope that things will work out.

Debbie:

Yeah. And thanks so much for sharing that to us because you, you have gone through a lot and depression is something very common with a lot of people, especially people who are very driven and you don’t realize how much a person is going through in the back end of it because you just see their success and even their failures. And most of the time we kind of just wanna be like, yeah, I’m fine. You know, you don’t really wanna show that you don’t wanna look vulnerable because you, you don’t wanna seem as being weak. And then at the back end of that, like you’re literally dying on the inside and nobody knows about it, which is really important to, to share with a lot of people because this is not an easy life that, that you’re leading Jaiden. And obviously for, for a lot of people, the last few years has been incredibly hard. It’s been really hard for, for a lot of people, but you know, at the end of the day, most, most of us are, you know, most people are very tough and if you can go through something that hard and then come out of it where you are Jaiden, you know, what else can you do? What else can you accomplish? Because you know, at the end of the day, if you don’t give up, as long as you don’t give up, you just keep going and you keep succeeding, you keep failing and succeeding some more

Jaiden:

Yeah, exactly. And I’m pretty sure you agree on there, Debbie, in saying that most people just give up way too early before they become successful. You know, success is right around the corner. Most people they’d rather just give in way too soon.

Debbie:

Yeah. I don’t know if you’ve ever seen this. I don’t know if this is a meme or if this was just like a, a cartoon, but this was from a long time ago where this guy is chiseling, trying to find gold. And then he gave up and it was only like five inches left. If he just kept going a little bit more, he would’ve struck gold. And then the next person on the other side just kept going. And then he finally like he was ready to give up and then he just kept going. And then he got all the gold. Meanwhile, the other person would’ve been there sooner, but he gave up five inches before chiseling through. So yeah. I mean, if you’re not gonna get it, somebody else will. Right. Cause it’s, there’s a lot, there’s enough for everybody, but it’s just, you know, you, you just gotta keep going sometimes.

Jaiden:

I can’t remember where you hear that from. I feel like I, I read that in the how to think and grow rich, but I, you can tell me where you heard that from. Cause I can’t remember.

Debbie:

I honestly, I don’t know. I just remember like a cartoon or a drawing of it. And there was like a small thing. I don’t even remember where that image is from, but every time someone mentions like not to give up and just keep going, you’re almost there. I’m like, I always think about that image. I’m like, yeah. I’m like, there’s a pot of gold there somewhere that you’re, you’re ready to get, but you just gave up

Jaiden:

Exactly. Success is literally right around the corner is what I tell myself every morning.

Debbie:

Exactly. Well, thank you so much, Jaiden, for sharing all of this with us, for sharing your journey with us. So let’s look forward to maybe 40 to 50 years from now and you’re looking back at your life. What legacy would you like to leave and what do you wanna be remembered for?

Jaiden:

I love that. Yeah, cuz I live by saying that my goal is not to live back and leave behind an inheritance, but to be able to kind of leave behind a legacy, I’ve actually thought a lot about this question. The kind of legacy I wanna leave behind is when they think of me or they think of Jaiden for the years to come, is that I was the most humbles person down to earth person that was willing to help them achieve their goals. So the reason why I’m doing what I’m doing and I run an you know, a platform where I teach people how to do eCommerce and start and grow and scale their drop shipping store. Right? And that’s just not because of the financial aspect of it because I genuinely wanna give back to the same opportunity that I’ve been blessed with. And I really just wanted be to have people see the same opportunities that I’ve seen done. So that’s kind of like I say, I wanna leave by highest. Like, you know, Jaiden helped me or he was a great individual that generally just loved people and wanting to help people.

Debbie:

I love that. And obviously you’re doing it right now and who knows, what’s going to come beyond this in the next, you know, 40, 50 years. So yeah, we would love to see where your journey keeps taking you, Jaiden.

Thank you again for being here. We really appreciate you!

If our listeners wanna learn more about you, where can they find you?

Jaiden:

Yeah, and thank you so much for having me there, Debbie.

So for anyone listening today, if you wanna find more about me, you can find me on my two most active social media platforms, Instagram, you can find me under Jaiden, J AI D E N V, So Jaiden Vu and exact same thing on TikTok, just Jaiden, J A I D E N V U.

Debbie:

Perfect. Thanks Jaiden! We really appreciate you!

Jaiden:

Thank you.


Listen to Jaiden’s extended interview where he talks about dealing with depression as an entrepreneur.

What you’ll find:

In this episode, Jaiden talks about dealing with depression as an entrepreneur.


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Show Credits:

Audio Engineer: Ben Smith

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