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Ep. 242: How this content creator has been working remotely around the world with Becca Siegel

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In this episode, I speak with Becca who is a blogger, content creator as well as a travel and lifestyle writer.

Her background in foreign languages, living abroad and travel helped her to create the lifestyle brand half half travel with her partner, Dan. 

Since returning from a 10-month around-the-world remote work trip including 4 months with RemoteYear, she has been working remotely from the Caribbean, Southeast Asia, locations across the US. 

Listen on to find out how Becca inspires others to be more adventurous and confident through remote work.

Listen Below:

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Transcription:

Debbie:

Hey, everyone. And thank you so much for being here. I am really excited to be talking to Becca today. 

Hey, Becca. How are you?

Becca:

Good. How are you doing?

Debbie:

I am wonderful. Can you tell us about you, Becca, and why you live an offbeat life? 

Becca:

Sure.

So, I’m within New York City with my husband, Dan, who is also my business partner, social media partner, and life partner. And I live an offbeat life because I never really saw myself as someone who could grow a media brand and kind of develop a personality that came from both sides, like, a digital presence and also what I do in real life -they’re two, very different things.

I’ve also lived an offbeat life because I lived abroad twice in my early twenties and then took time off of work in my late twenties, actually, when I turned 30, to go live abroad again as a digital nomad and learn how to work remotely. 

So those are a few of the things that keep me interested in my opinion. And these days, I live in New York. We live in Brooklyn where I’m currently looking at the skyline from my window. 

Yeah, my husband and I both work from home although we both work full time and we run our digital business completely on the side along with a few other projects and that’s how we stay busy. And I’m happy to be here today. 

Debbie:

That’s awesome. Well, there’s a lot there that we are going to be uncovering today. 

So Becca and I were talking before this interview, and we’re talking about her travels, her, going to the Philippines, and all of that. But the one thing we didn’t talk about was where you are right now. And I didn’t know this, Becca, but we’re actually the same place. I’m also in New York.

Becca:

Oh, shoot! I thought you were in California. It just goes to show you’ll never know. 

Debbie:

That is so hilarious ‘Cause we’re talking about all of these other destinations, meanwhile, we are in the same place right now, which is hilarious. 

Becca:

That is hysterical. Do you want to meet up later?

Debbie:

Yeah. We should’ve done this interview in person. 

Becca:

Oh, my gosh.

Debbie:

That’s so funny.

Becca:

I can’t believe it.

Debbie:

That just goes to show you how it’s such a small world.

Becca:

Right.

Debbie:

A lot of times, like, I’ll talk to somebody and they’re, like, in Asia, South America, Europe and then Becca and I are actually, like, just one burrow away. You’re in Brooklyn, I’m in Queens so…

Becca:

Oh, that’s so funny. I can’t believe it.

We’ll talk more offline. We’ll go find each other. 

Debbie:

It’s hilarious. 

But I love all of these journeys that you’ve had, Becca, and the one thing, and you mentioned to me before this, was that you actually grew on social media before you even started your blog because right now you run this incredible blog. 

Can you take us through that journey? Like, how did that even happen? Which is so funny. 

Becca:

Absolutely. We have a very offbeat story, it’s the truth. 

So my husband, Dan, and I met, we’re coming up on six years of when we met. We met in December 2015. And on one of our first dates, I started talking about how I love to travel and I really love to travel ever since I took my first trip to another continent. I was in Israel when I was 18 years old.

From there, I studied abroad in Hong Kong when I was 20. And then after college, I moved to Shanghai, China where I lived for two years from when I was 22 to 24.

So on one of my first dates with my husband, I said, “I love to travel. Everyone should travel. I can’t wait to travel,” and he said, “Well, I’m thinking of doing this thing where I work remotely and travel for a year.” And I said, “Well, that sounds incredible. Unfortunately, I can’t work remotely…” 

And he said, “Well, I’m applying to this program called Remote Year,” which I think a lot of our listeners might have heard of and I saw you had Matt Bowless and Eric Richard on the podcast. We know them from Remote Year which is this big fluid community of people who are active and inactive but they’ve done the programs at one point or another. 

And so my husband, Dan, did Remote Year for a year, for 12 months, where he went to Europe, Africa, and Latin America. And during that time, we dated long-distance, which is how we started our brand as a couple and started our, like, brand online.

Some of the months we were away from each other, I said, “Wouldn’t it be nice to start a project where we could do something where we didn’t just, like, miss each other on repeat? We kind of sound like a broken record.” 

So we started this Instagram account where we would take half of what he was doing and half of what I was doing and combine them together. And so it got kind of popular pretty fast. 

And before we knew it, we were in Oprah Magazine, Cosmopolitan, Travel and Leisure, and Condé Nast. Being featured in lots of publications. And there were stories about us being published, like, “They don’t know when they’ll see each other next.” And I was like, “That’s so funny to read about myself because I do know when I’m going to see him next.”

And so, we grew this Instagram account, kind of with some effort and kind of organically, just because we were posting regularly. We were posting, like, really original content, people were playing along with our story. 

And at one point we had, like, 37,000 followers but because of the algorithm, were, like, lost. Robots over the years-long story on social media. But for a while, Instagram was kind of, like, carrying us as the brand and it wasn’t until March 2017 or 18, we said, “We should really kind of have a blog to back this up.” 

And we looked at each other and we said, “Well, Dan, is a web designer and I’m a writer. Why don’t we already have a website?” But the thing is, you have two people with skills that kind of complement each other and are the two skills you need to build a website but we just had to do it. 

So we had to learn how to write for the internet ’cause I like writing. I’ve always been, like, a writer and I like putting words on paper and our page. But there is a specific style that you need for things to get caught by Google and for people to find it, we had to learn SEO. 

So it’s taken us, I guess, four years to get to where we are. And we now have, like, tens of thousands of visitors per month, we have a million lifetime views. It’s really all we work on. We don’t even really put much effort into Instagram anymore. We kind of let it just, like, chill there and, like, chat with people if we post something on stories if we take a trip. 

The website has become the most important, like, part of our online business. And it’s where we kind of run all of our collaborations with brands, trips, and hotels. And that’s been definitely one of the coolest, most offbeat things 

So, I think that’s, like, the most surprising thing about us. People  are like, “How are you?” We’re like, “Oh, we’ve worked a lot on our website.” And they say, “You have a website?” And we’re like, “Uuuuhhh…, yeah.”

So that’s our offbeat kind of little secret. 

Debbie:

I definitely can relate to that, right? ‘Cause a lot of people, only my close friends, probably know exactly what I do and it’s kind of, like, awkward sometimes to explain what you do. It’s so interesting that you say that too ’cause you’re like, “Yeah, only a few people know about this.” Meanwhile, like, in the industry, people know about you and you’ve been, like, featured in all of these different places. 

Becca:

And we have a lot of friends who just completely don’t work in digital media. Like, my full-time job was never even in digital media. It’s something I’ve completely learned after hours, weekends, nights, early mornings. 

A lot of people consider what they see online, in terms of follower count to be how popular you are. And once you become, like, a professional level blogger, you totally get the gist of what someone’s follower count on Instagram, not reflecting at all what their media account may be.

For example, we even have had bloggers with bigger blog reach than us, ask us. And I’m sure maybe you get the same thing. “How’d you get so many followers on Instagram? What did you do?” And we say, “Well, I can’t even explain it because it’s so independent, completely unrelated to how many people visited your website for months. They are apples and oranges. You can’t even compare them.” 

And you can also have people who are super popular on Instagram so it seems or TikTok, and they might have a website that doesn’t really have work put into it. So the two things are just from here to there and I think that’s one of the most interesting things to explain. 

Debbie:

It’s very independent, right? But the thing that I love about having a website, having a podcast, having that type of platform is we own it, right? 

And I think you know this and most content creators know this as well is that it can be really lucrative on both ends. But at the end of the day, if Instagram or Facebook or Tik-Tok decides that they don’t want to have that platform anymore and you didn’t take that audience to your own personal platform, you’re kind of screwed ’cause do you remember Vine, Becca? 

Becca:

Yeah.

Debbie:

Oh, my gosh.

Becca:

It was so short-lived. 

Debbie:

Yeah.

And I had a friend that was on Vine that actually became, like, really Vine famous. And then, Vine left and they had over a million followers on Vine and it didn’t follow through in the other platforms. But they created a business from it and they were able to do that. 

But it’s so crazy because it’s not just kind of like, “Oh, that’s never going to happen.” We’ve seen it happen before. So that’s why having your own platform is so important and to grow that is so crucial to all of this ‘cause, like you mentioned, you don’t even use it anymore but you have your blog and everything. 

Becca:

Right. 

And it’s kind of, like, people want to see it as an asset. They want to believe you exist and social media is, for what it’s worth, always going to be the place where you can see, like, what a creator is up to. 

Even a celebrity, anybody can see what they’re up to by what they post on stories but you didn’t see the hours they spent and the late nights they spent on their couch writing things for the website and making sure it runs, making sure it’s not down and optimizing it. And, like, all the incredible work that Dan puts into our website, just on the back and things I don’t even see.

Debbie:

Yeah.

It’s so funny because I feel like most of the time if you’re not on social media or if you’re not constantly on there, people just don’t think you exist but meanwhile, you’re busy. Like you said, you’re busy at work and you’re doing all of this stuff on your website and everything else that you’re doing which is fine. That’s how it goes, I guess.

Becca:

Yeah.

So that was the really abridged story. I think that’s the most compact I’ve ever made, that story.

Debbie:

I love it, though. That’s awesome. 

So, how did you end up actually leaving your day job to do this full-time? How did that all happen for you? 

Becca:

That’s another good story. 

So, it was around Spring 2018. I had been at my corporate job for a pretty long time. I felt kind of plateaued, I wasn’t inspired anymore. There’s a bunch of changes happening at the company. My office was in Midtown Manhattan, we were living in Brooklyn Heights. I didn’t have anything to complain about, like, commute-wise or the office being far to get to – nothing like that. 

I just had seen the light kind of and I had seen that Dan did Remote Year for a year and worked from Morocco, Serbia, London, Bogota, and Medellin. He did his job and he even started kind of a few businesses while he was on the road. 

And I had this, like, just in the back of my mind, that if your job takes place at a computer, you don’t need to be in a physical office to just keep doing what you’re doing. And so I kind of had this light. I saw some light at the end of a dark tunnel when I was visiting Dan, while he was on Remote Year. 

I said to my job, “Hey, I would really like to go visit my boyfriend for 2 weeks in Argentina. And I’m going to take a few days of vacation but for a few days I’m going to try to work remotely,” and I did. And there were no problems. There was internet, there were no issues there. 

And then around Spring, Dan was also at kind of a job that he could finagle with and negotiate going remote. And I put a notice with my job saying, “If Dan and I travel the world and I have no job, we’ll figure it out. We’ll work on the website. See what becomes a bit. Try our best.” 

Much to my kind of surprise and with some effort, I was rehired by my company after quitting as a part-time remote worker. 

Debbie:

That’s awesome.

Becca:

And so with that, Dan kind of negotiated the same thing with the company he was working for. And when I put up a notice, the company said, “Can we keep you longer?” And I said, “Nope, because I’m going to Amsterdam in 14 days. Goodbye!” 

And so we, like, sold everything. We sublet our apartment, packed our bags, and kind of just went to Europe, like, with no plan knowing that we had a lot of friends to see. We wanted to go to some offbeat places which we did and that was a lot of fun. 

And while we were on the road, we started making connections with some companies. Like, getting introductions and we did a few collaborations with tour companies and hotels and did a lot of photo-taking. 

And then there’s a plot twist whereby when we were in the Canary Islands in August, we got an offer from Remote Year to go on Remote Year for four months and to take photos and help them out with social media and some marketing.

Debbie:

That is incredible. 

Becca:

So we went on a short Remote Year program together with a group from September to December 2018, where we went to Peru, Colombia for 2 months, and Mexico City. And then in Spring 2019, we just continued on our own. We went to Vietnam for 4 weeks. And then we went to Taiwan for three weeks before we went to New York for our wedding.

So that was the trip. That was how I wound up becoming a digital nomad. 

Debbie:

It’s kind of a whirlwind, right? There’s just so much that happens. Once you put your foot on the gas, that was it. It was just a wild ride after that, which is pretty awesome. 

Now, you talked about going to Amsterdam, going to Europe, and then collaborating with all of these different types of companies, how did you do that? Especially for someone listening to this who wants to do something similar to what you guys are doing. 

That can seem really intimidating, Becca,  like, “Oh my gosh, I don’t know how to even talk to any of these companies.”

Becca:

Right. 

I think a lot has changed since Spring and Summer 2018 because it’s been 3 years. Media has become a lot more saturated with people who call themselves influencers. Everything has just become saturated and crowded and everyone seems to kind of be offering the same thing.

I think we got really lucky that 3 years ago the idea of doing what we were doing, was still a bit fresh, whereby since the pandemic, people, like, working remotely is just becoming, like, second nature you don’t really think. 

Debbie:

Yeah.

Becca:

And I would be someone that says, “I’ll be remote for a week, a month, or a year.” But as we were doing that, we were just building this brand, it was like, “Oh, you know, we’re this couple from New York. We’re traveling, we take photos, we have a blog, we’ve Instagram.” And we were kind of, like, the total package at that time. 

The collaboration started in November 2017. We had a new hotel from Lisbon reach out to us and say, “Hey, we really love your content. You’re welcome to come to stay with us at any time.”I showed Dan the email and I was like, “What is going on? We are being invited to a hotel in Portugal,” and it was completely true. 

And so because we decided to, like, quit everything and start this, like, remote digital traveling lifestyle in June, I think it was June, we went to Lisbon on this EuroTrip, which was the start of, like, our 10 months of traveling. And we stayed with the hotel and took photos for them and they interviewed us, took photos of us, and we wrote a review on our website. 

That’s when we realize that, like, photos are nice. It’s a plus if a hotel is looking for actual photos but what they want is something that’s going to be evergreen and live on, especially if you have a website with a lot of traction. Something that people can find, learn about their hotel, and hopefully book it. 

And as you work more in marketing and media, you learn that conversions are everything. Nobody wants anything. If the chances of converting someone into a paying customer are going to be low, no return on investment.

So after this experience in Portugal, we said, “Well, maybe we have something to offer.” And so when we went to Estonia and Amsterdam, we offered photos and a review on our blog as a means of being able to stay there at no cost.

In Amsterdam, the hotel that we partnered with had us as press, which means they didn’t have us for free. They give us a discount and, like, free brunch both days but we had to do a lot of work for them and sign a contract, which kind of makes you go like, “Chop chop!  Don’t screw up,”  because the contract says, “If you don’t deliver what you say you will, we’re going to charge you the full price.” 

So you have to be ready for things like that also. Hotels, tour companies, experiential businesses have a lot on the table, their margins might be low just like business-wise. People might have you sign stuff meaning you can’t run away if you take something for free and it’s never for free. 

I think the bottom line is nothing in life is for free. Everything, even your time spent on Facebook, you’re giving time away for free in exchange for seeing ads – nothing is free. 

So, I think that’s, like, the disclaimer to go into offering services that you might say, like, come second nature to you. Maybe it’s taking photos or writing or offering some type of marketing consultation. But everything is going to be in return for something else. 

Debbie:

And I think that’s what a lot of people, who are not in the industry, see; all of the beautiful images that you take and wherever you go and you say you got into that hotel for free. It’s just all free, like, you didn’t really do much work, and then they don’t see the behind-the-scenes.

And I think a lot of influencers have been and even content creators have gotten really bad raps from this, right? Because, don’t get me wrong, there are a few bad apples out there but for the most part, the content creators that you see that do really good work do a lot of work.

And I’ve seen it firsthand and I’m like, “I don’t know how they do it. I’d rather stay home and write my content. I don’t know how they do this,” ’cause it’s a lot of work.

Becca:

Yeah.

Debbie:

And then traveling around, that’s even more work, right?

Becca:

Right. 

Debbie:

And there’s a huge difference between just a regular leisurely travel than actually traveling and working at the same time. It’s not the same anymore. You don’t enjoy it as you do when you’re just there for vacation.

Becca:

Right. 

And I have to be honest, when we travel nowadays, it’s hardly ever for relaxing because we just optimized on being somewhere else to take photos. And I think the only trip in the past, like, 3 years that we didn’t really take photos to publish anything about was our trip to Los Angeles over the summer. 

We didn’t really take photos of anything. We went for a wedding, we went to see friends, and we went to work remotely. Every other trip we’ve done, we take photos. We have a list. We plan our blog content. We say, “We’re going to put this on Instagram. We’re going to write this type of photo gallery for our website.” And everything becomes, I don’t want to say a chore, but everything becomes work.

So we’re trying to enjoy ourselves but we’re just like, “We need to capitalize on finding a place to see the sunset,“ and, “Oh my God, it’s raining today. How should we make the best of it?” Because we want to have content and always be publishing.

Debbie:

Yeah. It’s true.

Your mentality becomes totally different. And you kind of have to go outside of that when you are traveling for leisure or at least, even if you’re there for work, like, a few hours just to, like, not have any cameras, just you and your partner, just enjoying yourselves because otherwise…

Sometimes you don’t even really get to see the place ’cause you’re so focused on creating images. It’s so crazy.

Becca:

It’s crazy. Yeah.

Although, no regrets.

Debbie:

Yeah.

Becca:

We’ve seen some great things and had some really awesome experiences. 

Debbie:

Exactly. 

We’re not complaining. 

Becca:

Yeah.

Debbie:

It’s not a complaint, it’s just giving a different perspective and how it actually is.

So now, Becca, obviously, like you mentioned, there have been a lot of changes in 2018 now we’re in 2021 and obviously, because of the pandemic, it has hit the travel industry really badly the last few years. Did you ever pivot your business? How did that make you change things around? 

Becca:

We pivoted fast and I will say we were traveling more or less right up to when coronavirus became, like, a real concerning thing. We were in the Dominican Republic from January to February 2020 so, 2020. And we came home just when things were getting a little touchy. 

I actually went to a media conference where people had stopped shaking hands around March 7th, March 4th. I was invited to a Japanese tourism event in Manhattan around March 10th, and I said, “I probably shouldn’t go. There’s this covid thing,” and of course, that’s all for the better.

But basically, Dan and I were quarantined in our very small New York City apartment. 

Debbie:

Oh, my God.

Becca:

And what could we do?

We could work from home and start working on the blog and nobody wanted to travel. Nobody could travel. So we started reading work-from-home content, which is now, I would say next to travel, the biggest content section on our website. 

So we started writing everything from how to set up your desk working from home, standing desks working from home, how to limit distractions working from home, how to have the best meetings working from home.

And if you go to our website, which is HalfHalfTravel.com, you’ll see how much time in 2020 we put into working from home just because for a while you couldn’t really see that it was going to end anytime soon. And still, to be honest, it hasn’t. 

The only change is that people are now going to work remotely and they’re going near and far to do that. But we have a lot of remote work content, remote work, and travel.

And so kind of we’ve started pivoting our business into more of lifestyle. Like, if people want to do some of the things we’ve done between working from home, working remotely and traveling, they can find all of that on our website. 

And our most recent pivot is writing a home section which is not about working at home. It’s just about living at home because that’s something we’ve done and a lot of people have done in the past 18 months to two years. We’ve been spending time at home. 

So now when you go to our website, you can see more about, just like, living at home and how to move between now and your next trip. So that’s been our major pivot.

Debbie:

I love that.

So how has that been for you? ‘Cause I know there are some people that just couldn’t stand it, especially living here in New York City. You don’t have a lot of space. So you either love each other more or you end up killing each other. How has that been for you?

Becca:

That’s a great question. 

And obviously, we didn’t kill each other because we got married. 

Debbie:

Well, did you get married during the pandemic, or was it before?

Becca:

We got engaged in May 2020 and we had a civil wedding in September 2020 and we had our Jewish wedding in September 2021. 

Debbie:

Oh, wow.

Becca:

So we had two weddings. 

Debbie:

Wait, so that’s just pretty recent. 

Becca:

Yeah.

Debbie:

Congratulations. 

Becca:

Thank you. 

Congratulations to you too. I saw your beautiful wedding photos in the desert. 

Debbie:

I know. We were supposed to get married in April 2020 and then it didn’t happen but we were still gonna elope ‘cause that was my husband’s dream wedding by the way. I didn’t have a dream wedding. That was his dream wedding.

Becca:

I didn’t have a dream wedding either, I was like, “I don’t care. I just want to take a big trip.”

Debbie:

Exactly.

Becca:

I don’t care about marrying him but, like, if we got married on the street or in, like, a big venue somewhere – I don’t care. I just wanna take a good trip after.

Debbie:

Yeah.

Actually, we ended up combining both of our dream weddings. He wanted to get married in the desert. Like, he really loves the desert. We’ve done a lot of hikes in the desert, I was like, “WellI just want to rent out a really nice house and invite our closest family and friends. I don’t want anything big and I want it outside,” and I was like, “That’s it.” 

So that’s what we ended up having and it was actually really perfect. 

Becca:

Yeah.

It is perfect. I don’t know. Everything happens for a reason. The pandemic is horrible but we would have had a massive wedding otherwise and it becomes stressful and you plan it for a year and we had to just many weddings and it’s been pretty chill. So no regrets there.

In terms of the pandemic in New York and being in a really small apartment with no dishwasher, no laundry, I would say we’ve really made the best of it, especially while it was too scary to ride a car, take the subway, take a bus, take a plane. 

Dan was already into running and I got into running because it was the best way to just get out, workout, get fresh air, and like, see something new. We both ran, I ran 200 miles in 2020 and he ran more. 

So we ran to Manhattan, we ran around Brooklyn. We started hiking in Prospect Park. We took a lot of photos, saw our friends from a distance. And looking back, like, at my personal photos, I’m like, “We did so many beautiful things in 2020 just being at home.” 

Seeing different neighborhoods, really getting to know our neighborhood because we’ve been too busy working and commuting and just being out and traveling before to get to know the streets and the names of the streets five blocks away, and finding the most beautiful houses with the most beautiful ivy and seeing it change in Autumn. And taking photos in the park.

And 2020 became kind of, like, a blessing in that way. So, we kind of branded it as traveling within New York and it’s very memorable

Debbie:

It’s kinda nice to do that, right? Because, like you mentioned, you’re able to appreciate what’s in your backyard. And I think for us who have, like, itchy feet, you don’t get to do that. 

And I don’t know. Honestly, for me, in a way, I’ve become a home buddy. I like being at home. 

Becca:

Me too.

Debbie:

Like, I don’t know.

I’m like, “I kind of like this now. I kind of just have my space, just relaxing, not being stressed out ’cause sometimes it gets really stressful in that sense but it’s nice. I do like it”.

Becca:

It is nice. Yeah. There’s no place like home. 

Debbie:

There isn’t.

I’m like, “It’s so nice when you’re actually appreciating everything that you have.”

And I think one of the main things that I’ve really learned from this whole thing, from the pandemic, is just being grateful for what you have because we’ve lost a lot. Everybody has lost a lot and I think if we don’t become grateful, it just becomes, I don’t know, stifling and it becomes tragic, right? 

So it’s kind of crazy but hopefully, it’ll all get better. 

Becca:

Yeah. Good positivity. 

Debbie:

I love it. 

So now,  What are your plans? Like, how does the next year, even five, look for you, Becca? Because it seems like you’ve pivoted, you created all of these new changes but traveling has started to come to life now. Slowly but steadily.

Becca:

Traveling is definitely on the table for us. We’re going to Chicago next week. So that’ll be maybe only our second or third flight since pre-pandemic, pretty exciting still. 

And then we’re going to Philadelphia, Dan’s running a marathon. And then after that, I mean, like, the sky’s the limit. The world’s, I don’t want to say becoming safer, but with booster shots and more of the world becoming vaccinated, I felt more confident being armed with more information about this virus as time goes on. 

And I have said, if you calculate your risk and you don’t do anything that makes you uncomfortable or is, like, objectively risky behavior, you can travel safely and see the world safely and keep other people safe too. 

So as the world opens up, I am looking very positively at getting out there again as they say. When the time is right, not jumping to any conclusions. And we do have, like, a bucket list of places we really want to go to but unfortunately, it’s for places that are not quite at the level of safety that, like, Mexico or Costa Rica are right now. 

Our bucket list place is Ukraine and we really, really want to go to Ukraine and I’ve gone to a bunch of podcasts now and they say to both me and Dan, “Okay, on the count of three, say the place you want to go to the most. 1… 2… 3…” We both say Ukraine.

Yeah, that’s just our style. We like to go to offbeat places we’ve never even been to, like Paris or Rome. We’d rather go to Myanmar and Sri Lanka. We’d rather see the things that are more rarely seen. 

Debbie:

I love that. 

I’m the same way but I’m more into, like, little Islands. I like small Islands in small places ’cause it’s easier to get around ’cause I like exploring by myself too outside when my husband can’t. But yeah, I love that. That’s such a great thing to do and I think too, like, a lot of people have seen what Paris is like, Rome is like but most people have never really seen Ukraine. 

So, I love it. 

So Becca, let’s look into maybe 30 to, maybe, 40 years from now and you’re looking back at your life, what legacy would you like to leave and what do you want to be remembered for? 

Becca:

Wow, that’s a great question that I’ve never been asked before.

I think being positive. I think a lot of staying positive and also Dan helping me stay positive, has been a big part of what’s happened for us in the past few years. And also I’d like to be remembered for, I don’t want to say starting something from nothing, but everything starts from nothing.

And one of the biggest lessons I’ve learned in the past few years is that if you have a dream, there is no better time than now to start it. And everybody says this but it’s just true. You have to put your foot down and say, “Today is day number one,” and try to grow that dream. 

And for us, I think that’s been building this digital content business that also really has our personalities. And every year we look back, we say, “Oh, how did we do that a year ago?” 

So, 30 years from now, I can’t imagine looking back at what we did 30 years prior. And, for me, alone, that’s going to be the coolest but for anyone else, joining along, hopefully, the same.

Debbie:

Yeah.

And I can’t even imagine what this whole thing is going to be, like, in 30 to 50 years, right? Because right now we’re essentially, like, in the beginning part of it. And then, like, well, yeah, I can’t even.

Becca:

Yeah.

I mean, the internet is only so new. Like, it’s 20 years new or whatever. 

Debbie:

Already in 20 years, there have been so many changes. I’m pretty sure it’s going to be beyond us ’cause I’ll be old and be like, “I don’t know what’s happening anymore.”

Becca:

Right.

Debbie:

I mean, already Tik Tok to me is like, “I don’t know what’s happening.” 

Becca:

It makes me feel like a dinosaur. I agree.

Debbie:

Thank you so much, Becca, for joining us here today. If our listeners want to know more about you, where can they find you?

Becca:

Sure. And thank you so much for having me. This is super fun. 

Anyone can find me and Dan at @halfhalftravel on Instagram, and our website: HalfHalfTravel.com where you can always reach out, Send as an email through there. We’re also on Pinterest at HalfHalfTravel, Facebook as HalfHalfTravel, and Twitter as HalfHalfTravel. 

So, can’t go wrong with any of these five platforms. And we look forward to hearing from anyone who has been listening today.

Debbie:

Love it. 

And also, I love your branding where it’s, like, half half travel everywhere. That’s all you need to know. You can find them on any of those platforms.

Well, thank you again, Becca, we really appreciate you.

Becca:

Thank you. Appreciate you too.

Listen to Becca’s extended interview where she shares there is no one path to growing a blog audience.

What you’ll find:

In this episode, Becca will teach you the challenging paths that you have to take to grow your blog audience.


Follow Becca:


Show Credits:

Audio Engineer: Ben Smith

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